Tributes for Prof. David Sanders

Write your tributes for Prof. David Sanders

It is with extreme sadness that we announce the passing away of our comrade Prof. David Sanders, a beloved colleague, friend, mentor and activist. David passed away on 30th August after a heart attack. He was a founding member of People’s Health Movement (PHM) in 2000 in Savar, Bangladesh and has been the co-chair of PHM from past six years.

David Sanders was a Professor and founding Director of the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape (UWC), South Africa. He was a specialist paediatrician with postgraduate qualifications in Public Health, and had over 40 years experience in health policy and program development in Zimbabwe and South Africa. David had extensive experience in the areas of primary health care, child health and nutrition, and human resources for health as part of health systems development.

He had published extensively in these fields, as well as on the political economy of health, including on structural adjustment and development aid, having authored or co-authored three books: “The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment”, “Questioning the Solution: the Politics of Primary Health Care and Child Survival” and “Fatal Indifference: the G8, Africa and Global Health”, in addition to many chapters and journal articles.

He was on the Steering Committee of the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition from 2002 – 2006, and a member of the Knowledge Network of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. He was a founder member of the UK Politics of Health Group, of the International People’s Health Council and of PHM. He was a managing editor of Global Health Watch 2.

The untimely demise of David is an irreparable loss to all of us personally, David’s family, and for the broader health movement globally and in South Africa. We offer our condolences and solidarity to David’s wife Sue Fawcus, and his children Lisa, Oscar and Ben. PHM-Global and PHM-South Africa will continue to carry forward David’s vision of strengthening the people’s health movement towards health for all.

Thank you David

TRIBUTE MESSAGES


Prof. Marc van der Putten
Faculty of Public Health, Thammasat University, Thailand
[email protected]
Shocked by the news that David passed away... I met David the 1st time over 20 years back at a Public Health Schools without Walls meeting. His amazing insights and critical appraisal of determinants of the public’s health were fueled by his intellect, his genuine concern and his ability to learn from those at the grassroots. We will miss you David!

Prof. Marc van der Putten
Faculty of Public Health, Thammasat University, Thailand
[email protected]
Shocked by the news that David passed away... I met David the 1st time over 20 years back at a Public Health Schools without Walls meeting. His amazing insights and critical appraisal of determinants of the public’s health were fueled by his intellect, his genuine concern and his ability to learn from those at the grassroots. We will miss you David!

Sangnim Lee
On behalf of "Services for the Health in Asian and African Regions (SHARE)", Japan
[email protected]
David inspired the world in significant global health issues including PHC, SDH, Nutrition and Child Health. We, David's friends in Japan will never forget David. Thanks so much David!! An international health NGO, "Services for the Health in Asian and African Regions (SHARE) released Tributes for David in SHARE's website below. It includes special memorial messages from David Werner. https://share.or.jp/opinion_advocacy/news/_david_sanders_werner.html

Maria Hamlin Zuniga
PHM Latn Ameriaca
[email protected]
A tribute to David Sanders. Maria Hamlin Zuniga I want to share some experiences from the years leading up to the establishment of the Peopñles Health Movement in the year 2000, especially for those of the younger generation of PHM that should learn more about the prehistory of health activism. David Sanders and I met in the early 80s when he was doing some work with David Werner. We shared a common history of human rights and civil rights struggles: David in Africa and I in the US and Central America. We shared a common commitment to the Alma Ata Declaration and the concept of comprehensive primary health care and the training of community based health workers. We were both radical activists for Health for All. We had a dream of PHC in societies in transition. In the late 80s we were trying to organize a small international meeting of health activists involved in liberation struggles around the world. But before we could actually have the meeting we lived the reality of the fall of the Berlin wall and the defeat of the Sandinista Popular Revolution in Nicaragua where I was living and working. In late 1991 we had our meeting of activists from societies in transition, not to our socialist dream, but to societies facing neoliberal policies and severe structural adjustment programs. That international meeting resulted in the formation of a small network of health activists and academics with a radical position on PHC and Health for All. For a decade that network, the International Peoples Health Council, IPHC, organized and/or participated in international meetings around the world: an IPHC meeting in Palestine in 1993, then in South Africa after apartheid. We shared our particular points of view at the World Health Assembly, at the Copenhagen Social Development Summit, at the UN meetings in Cairo and Beijing. And also in meetings in Malaysia, the Philippines, India and Australia. During the early years of IPHC the small new network was able to develop analysis useful for organizing around the world. The book “Questioning the Solution” by David Sanders and David Werner was and important tool for academics and for community health workers. David Werner and I spent two sessions with David Sanders at the University of Western Cape Summer School programs doing workshops on Child to child methodology. That was just great getting the diverse students to see the importance of involving children in health education and promotion. It was a challenge getting the kids on to the campus, because the insurance program did not cover young children. But we did it and had a great time. We were thankful to David for inviting us, and to the faculty and students for teaching us so much about South Africa and the struggle for health there. At a meeting in 1997 in Penang, we decided, together with Consumer International and other organizations, to have a People's Health Assembly in 2000 to demonstrate to the world that the Alma Ata promise of Health for All by the year 2000 was a was never met . And to do so we set up and organizing committee with 7 other organizations to decide on the time, place and content of the first PHA. After much discussion we decided on GK in Savar, Bangladesh as the site because of the long history of GK in the commitment to the Alma Ata Declaration. The IPHC activists committed to developing the wonderful organizing materials for preparing for the first assembly. From 1997 until December of the year 2000 I worked with David as the only woman on the core organizing committee of the fist PHA. That was not an easy task. There were not that many outspoken feminist activists in communty health at that time. That came later. There still are not enough feminist activists in the PHM today. This is a call out to all you young women to get more involved. After PHA I most of the IPHC members became key figures in the new movement that was agreed upon at the Assembly….. And so we continue until today. I hope that the PHM activists of today have learned a bit more about David and about our prehistory. Now it depends on you the younger spirited activists to carry on this important and essential work of the struggle for health.

Simon Wright
Save the Children
[email protected]
David was a titan and we will miss his voice in global health discussions. He was always ready to challenge cant and unexamined orthodoxies, to tease but always with humour. He had enormous energy to keep fighting for what is right and we cannot afford to lose voices like his.

Carmen Baez
PHM Argentina
[email protected]
I met David Sanders in South Africa in the period immediately post-Apartheid when we were building a new universal health system for all. I remember the first years listening at conferences and meetings to his clear and powerful message about the strategy of Primary Health Care, community participation, intersectoral approach, social determinants of health and other concepts. I had arrived from Mozambique with experience of a socialist health system based on PHC with very little knowledge about other systems beyond my own experience. In those days I was working for the Gauteng Health Department and my boss and comrade, Dr. Rafik Bismilla, offered me the opportunity to attend a meeting in Cape Town related to the “progressive“ approach to health. I got to understand a while later that this was a preparatory African meeting towards the foundation of the People’s Health Movement. I was delighted to meet people who, on reflection today, influenced my life forever: David Sanders who had already impressed me as I said; David Werner who wrote “Where there is not doctor”, a book widely distributed in Mozambique; and Zafrullah Chowdhury, who wrote a book about the politics of drugs in Bangladesh, an issue that I did not fully understand at the time. The 3 days meeting made a huge impact on me because, for the first time, I was understanding clearly the power struggle in the health field. After the meeting, I took on the task of mobilizing organizations and individuals to go to the meeting in Bangladesh. I differed with Dave on some issues; he was not very convinced to bring on board government officials although they had been anti-apartheid activists before. In retrospect, he was right; most of them were absorbed by the system and did not support the PHM work for long. In December 2000 in Bangladesh, a quite small South African delegation was part of the first Peoples’ Health Assembly. There I was able to appreciate the role of David as a global activist; every time he spoke I observed people identifying with his messages about the contesting power structures, the medical hegemony, the importance of defending the PHC principles of Alma Ata, and the arguments for building a movement from the bottom up. From then on we were comrades in a newborn global health movement and continued to be until his passing. Back home, both of us started to build up the PHM in SA; he did it through his academia and other networks, and I by distributing the PHM Charter in every work meeting where I could try to recruit new sympathizers. I believe that the PHM today is a strong and respected civil society voice in SA thanks to his persistent and visionary work. The following years we became also colleagues with David, sharing joint projects between HST were I worked and SPH team led by him. His professional experience as a pediatrician in rural areas treating malnourished children enriched his academic inputs on these projects to improve the life of children. At the same time, I decided to do my MPH at UWC at the School of Public Health newly founded by David and others and I enjoyed each subject and appreciated the methodology and the progressive approach taught. The winter and summer schools of the distance course were crucial to reach more people and provide them with the tools and knowledge to convert them into public health workers and managers. This was the essence of David’s vision, so practical and appropriate in this phase! He became the tutor of my mini thesis about the Cuban medical mission in SA, he played this role with the impartiality and scientific rigor characteristic of David. Since I returned to Argentina after exile, I kept contact with David personally and through PHM. He came three times to Argentina in the last years, one with Susan. Recently, we had the pleasure of a visit by David again, this time invited by one the member organizations of the PHM Argentina, the Family Doctor’s/PHC doctors Association, to their annual congress. The Argentinian participants at the last PHA in Bangladesh in 2018 were impressed by him (like me many years ago), and were very kind to have him here with us. So, I was asked to facilitate his participation. It was difficult to find dates but finally he came and he even went to Patagonia for a couple of days for some trout fishing, one of his passions. We were happy that young participants, amongst them my son Pablo Rall, who acted as his translator, had the opportunity to get to know one of the icons in the struggle for health for all in the world and heard his strong message to keep aloft the banner and continue to defend the principles and vision of Alma Ata, not UHC. We adopted the Alternative Declaration of Astana and will take it forward as his legacy. Without knowing it, this was our farewell to Dave. With deep sadness, I would like to say to my comrade, colleague, professor, tutor and friend: A luta continua for health for all! Amandla ngawethu! Hamba kahle David! Carmen Baez

Carmen Baez
PHM Argentina
[email protected]
Buenos Aires, 18th September 2019 The People’s Health Movement organizations in Argentina regret the enormous loss represented by the physical disappearance of Prof. David Sanders, a steadfast fighter for HEALTH FOR ALL since Alma Ata up to the present. We were fortunate to host David in our country last May, some of us for the first time. We were enriched by his words that encouraged us to continue our work and our struggles and we were inspired by his example of coherence and perseverance. Hasta la Victoria siempre David! PHM Argentina: FAMG/AMGBA LAICRIMPO RED JARILLA ADESAM ALAMES SOBERANIA SANITARIA FORO RAMON CARRILLO La INTERNACIONAL DE LA ESPERANZA

Reginald Adjetey Annan
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
[email protected]
I will remember David for his strength and passion for health promotion in Africa. I will remember him for his down to earth approach in dealing with people. I will remember him for his guidance and mentorship for young public health nutritionists. Thank you David for bringing us along through mentorship.

David McCoy
Peoples Health Movement
[email protected]
I've written a longer tribute to David which is on the UWC School of Public Health website in which I tried to distill David's key characteristics and attributes and why they are important and relevant to the many challenges we face in global health, academia and society more generally. He certainly inspired me to think, act and be better - in many ways. And I for one will do what I can to continue his way of doing public health. It's great to see so many tributes to David and so much evidence of the impact he had on so many people - and it's a solace be part of the global PHM family, of which David was so fond. Go well. Hamba Kahle.

Kerry Cullinan
health journalist
[email protected]
I have interviewed David many times, and he has always been patient and happy to explain his views in detail. When most health sector activists and researchers in South Africa were focused on infectious diseases, David was raising alarm bells about the rise in non-communicable diseases, particularly related to changes in diet. I remember bumping into him some years ago on Muizenberg beach and he called after me: "Not everyone is dying from HIV." I last interviewed with him a couple of months ago about SA's campaign to get a tax on sugary drinks and, as usual, he was busy thinking of ways in which he could help to push the agenda for a healthier country. He will be so badly missed for many things, including his generous mentoring of younger people, his passionate commitment to fairness and equality and his dry sense of humour. Hamba Kahle, David!

suwit wibulpolprasert
International Health Policy Program
[email protected]
'Inspiration changes the world. David has inspired millions of new generation actors to change the world'.

Lola Dare
CHESTRAD Global
[email protected]
Rest my dear friend. It was a deep privileged to know and work with you. A rare blend of knowledge, commitment and courage that I shall miss and we need now more than ever. Thank you for all you stood for. Sail David

Jane Booth
Nurse
[email protected]
My condolence to the family and friends of Prof David Saunders. He was an absolute visionary and has worked tirelessly to promote equity in health care using his vast experience. He was an absolute beacon of hope in South Africa. I hope that his teachings will continue to inspire young poeple never to give up!

Howard Waitzkin
University of New Mexico, Allende Program in Social Medicine
[email protected]
I am writing to thank not only David but also all of you who have described his wonderful impacts on your lives and those of so many others. His loss seems devastating, even for people like me who never had the opportunity of working closely or becoming friends with him. Beyond reiterating the admiration and gratitude that you already have expressed, I perceived that David was fundamentally a person of the non-dogmatic left. In fact, my final encounter with him happened last year at the Left Forum in New York City, where he participated in a session concerning our recent collective book on “moving beyond capitalism for our health.” David passionately wanted health for all, but also a new world order, based not on capital accumulation but rather on compassion, equality, mutual aid, and social justice. Gratitude to David flows partly from that legacy. David Sanders presente! Howard Waitzkin

Michael Krawinkel
University of Giessen, Germany
[email protected]
Coming from a background of Primary Health Care for people in resource-poor areas of the world I always admired the clear views and perspectives of David. We met at many occasions and I enjoyed his wisdom, humour, and friendliness. His disappearance from the scene is a great loss and I feel grateful for having known David. His legacy will last far beyond his physical life. Thanks for all, David. Michael

Margaret Hilson
Retired Director of Global Health at the Canadian Public Health Association
[email protected]
Dr David Sanders has been such a huge inspirational presence in the global struggle for health for all for the past 60 years. It is almost impossible to imagine his physical absence. However, I can think of almost no other individual who has imbued global health politics with such clear vision of social justice that could be brought about within and by the workers in the health sector. He did not suffer fools gladly; was not impressed by political privilege or power; shared his vision; promoted and encouraged young health professionals to choose the option of health for all and at the same time, was a consummate public health professional with equal respect for science, research and social activism. We are fortunate to have such a rich compilation of his writings to inform future generations. He will be greatly missed.

Melanie Alperstein
People's Health Movement -South Africa
[email protected]
David you were a rock that kept us focussed, always critically analysing and re-analysing the causes of the causes of the causes and many other socio-economic and political aspects affecting our lives and particularly those in poverty. And your dry humour, to lighten the most serious times and discussions. words can't express how much you are and will be missed.

Fabien NKILI
MPS GABON
[email protected]
tu resteras à jamais dans nos coeurs Prof. Repose en paix. tu as combattu le bon combat.

Hasheem Mannan
PHM India Ireland
[email protected]
David's teaching, research and advocacy for right to health with access to primary health care will be a legacy that will be carried forward by us. My interactions with him over the years as a member of PHM Switzerland, India, USA and Ireland continue to guide my work and that of my own students.

Felistus Chipako
PHM Zambia
[email protected]
David Saunders, I got to meet you in Bangladesh for the first and last time. I remain gratified that I learnt from the best. You are an icon for health rights not only in Africa but the world. Your spirit will continue the fight. Rest well in God's bossom.

Anthony Zwi
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
[email protected]
A sad moment for global public health. David Sanders was an inspiration to me and many others. I got to know David well after doing my 5th year medical student elective with the Oxfam Health Team in newly liberated Zimbabwe. He worked to “rehabilitate” remote rural hospitals that were neglected or damaged during the liberation struggle, and to situate them in the broader health system context in support of primary health care. He helped health cadres trained in liberation armies, to gain a foothold in the post-colonial health system. It was a struggle then, and often still is, to give adequate recognition to those trained elsewhere, their diverse experiences, community and cultural roots, and bonds of trust and reciprocity. David generously engaged with shaping debates and practice in the health system under development: the “Struggle for Health” was ongoing. Securing the right to health was informed by deeply held political views, an emphasis on social justice, on equity in access to the resources and determinants that influence health. Hi commitment and dedicated contributions characterized his working life in Zimbabwe and South Africa and at a global intellectual and civil society level. His depth of purpose was balanced by his mischievous sense of humour, an infectious chuckle, a not-infrequent Yiddish story or witty observation. His joy was to engage, challenge, and stimulate. I last spent time with him at an event at the American University in Beirut, where we were generously hosted by the impressive local academics and students - dancing, laughing, eating, and of course, trying to make sense of a disturbed and deeply unfair world... I will miss him: he inspired a direction and focus that I try to keep alive in my own work. I wish family and friends long life.

Leslie London
PHM SA; University of Cape Town School of Public Health and Family Medicine
[email protected]
Friend, activist, compatriot, combatant (intellectually), socialist, person of incredible principle, leader by example, inspiration, mentor to many mentors of others over generations, fearless fighter for justice, joker, supporter, facilitator, pioneer, warm, and beloved by family, friends, fellow activists - and respected for all this even by some of his biggest foes. David was all these things and more. We will miss him endlessly and have to find our way without him. But he believed another world is possible and so do we. That is David's legacy.

Norbert Hirschhorn
John Snow Inc. (JSI), retired
[email protected]
I liked David enormously. We debated the comparative advantages of oral rehydration solution for diarrhea prepared either at home by the mother, or available in packets from a clinic or pharmacy. We disagreed but always in good faith and good nature. David always kept his principal focus on the family, not the medical system

Zaeem Haq
Save the Children
[email protected]
We are much saddened to hear of this great loss. David was a true gentleman, an accomplished doctor, researcher and academic, and above all an ardent believer and champion for universal health rights. He worked for Save the Children twice; first as a consultant in early 2000’s as part of our Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre authoring a report on child health and poverty in 2004 which strengthened our cross-thematic focus and social determinants approach to health and nutrition. In 2011, he returned as our Regional Health & HIV Advisor for East & Southern Africa, following his ‘formal’ retirement from the School of PH he founded at the Univ of Western Cape. He wanted to be part-time and slow down a bit, although his passion kept him going strong till the last day. I can still remember being a bit embarrassed interviewing him for this role, but having him join us was quite exciting as he was a great resource for the team in London and country health advisors in the region. He visited a few of our country programmes, and made the most impact for our integrated health, nutrition and livelihoods programme in Tanzania. David may have worked briefly with us but he surely left his mark on Save the Children – by contributing to our policy positions on health & nutrition and our integrated approach to programming for vulnerable communities, by mentoring our global and country staff, and most of all by being a vocal champion for children’s rights in the global south. He spent a lifetime achieving great things. May he now rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are with David's family, friends and colleagues. Dr Zaeem Haq MBBS, MPH, FRSPH Medical Director Save the Children St Vincent House, 30 Orange Street, London, WC2H 7HH, UK www.savethechildren.net

Zaeem Haq
Save the Children
[email protected]
We are much saddened to hear of this great loss. David was a true gentleman, an accomplished doctor, researcher and academic, and above all an ardent believer and champion for universal health rights. He worked for Save the Children twice; first as a consultant in early 2000’s as part of our Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre authoring a report on child health and poverty in 2004 which strengthened our cross-thematic focus and social determinants approach to health and nutrition. In 2011, he returned as our Regional Health & HIV Advisor for East & Southern Africa, following his ‘formal’ retirement from the School of PH he founded at the Univ of Western Cape. He wanted to be part-time and slow down a bit, although his passion kept him going strong till the last day. I can still remember being a bit embarrassed interviewing him for this role, but having him join us was quite exciting as he was a great resource for the team in London and country health advisors in the region. He visited a few of our country programmes, and made the most impact for our integrated health, nutrition and livelihoods programme in Tanzania. David may have worked briefly with us but he surely left his mark on Save the Children – by contributing to our policy positions on health & nutrition and our integrated approach to programming for vulnerable communities, by mentoring our global and country staff, and most of all by being a vocal champion for children’s rights in the global south. He spent a lifetime achieving great things. May he now rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are with David's family, friends and colleagues. Dr Zaeem Haq MBBS, MPH, FRSPH Medical Director Save the Children St Vincent House, 30 Orange Street, London, WC2H 7HH, UK www.savethechildren.net

Zaeem Haq
Save the Children
[email protected]
We are much saddened to hear of this great loss. David was a true gentleman, an accomplished doctor, researcher and academic, and above all an ardent believer and champion for universal health rights. He worked for Save the Children twice; first as a consultant in early 2000’s as part of our Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre authoring a report on child health and poverty in 2004 which strengthened our cross-thematic focus and social determinants approach to health and nutrition. In 2011, he returned as our Regional Health & HIV Advisor for East & Southern Africa, following his ‘formal’ retirement from the School of PH he founded at the Univ of Western Cape. He wanted to be part-time and slow down a bit, although his passion kept him going strong till the last day. I can still remember being a bit embarrassed interviewing him for this role, but having him join us was quite exciting as he was a great resource for the team in London and country health advisors in the region. He visited a few of our country programmes, and made the most impact for our integrated health, nutrition and livelihoods programme in Tanzania. David may have worked briefly with us but he surely left his mark on Save the Children – by contributing to our policy positions on health & nutrition and our integrated approach to programming for vulnerable communities, by mentoring our global and country staff, and most of all by being a vocal champion for children’s rights in the global south. He spent a lifetime achieving great things. May he now rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are with David's family, friends and colleagues. Dr Zaeem Haq MBBS, MPH, FRSPH Medical Director Save the Children St Vincent House, 30 Orange Street, London, WC2H 7HH, UK www.savethechildren.net

RAVI RAM
PHM KENYA
[email protected]
Such an intellectual tower, a passionate social activist and a humble man - rarely do we see the best in humanity together in one person. Two of those three would be quite good in any person, but Prof. Sanders embodied them all. David did more than ask questions of society, disease, bureaucracies and institutions, comrades - though he was excellent at that. He tapped each of us in our souls, so that we also aspired for more justice, equity, in ourselves, our work and our societies. And, the way he did it was not as the formidable overlord he could have been, but as a companionable fellow traveler who we inevitably discovered to have a much better map than anyone else. David's passing is a shock to all of us. He has done so much for the world, and never tired of pushing for something new. I'll selfishly admit that I have thought of all the questions I hadn't yet asked him, and now will have to struggle without him. The one consolation is that after a full, eventful life, he passed peacefully, with his wife and in good health.  By random chance, David and I shared a dorm room after PHA4 (in Nov. 2018 at GK in Savar, Bangladesh - my good fortune, less so his). After a discussion one evening, and In a contemplative mood, David wondered what happened to us in civil society. He lived for the challenge of citizens demonstrating against those in power, marshaling moral integrity and intellectual firepower against vested interest that keep people poor and unhealthy. That was David, and as we commemorate his life with us, let us channel his passion and energy for the world he let us glimpse in the way he lived. A luta continua, vitória é certa!

Siyamthanda Dastile
Tulbagh Youth Forum, TAC Chris Hani Branch (Tulbagh), People's Health Movement SA
[email protected]
Hambakahle Prof. David Sanders... within 2 days at UCT medical campus during an NHI workshop (13-14 April 2019) he motivated me to go back to my small town (Tulbagh) to facilitate health awareness and issues faced by the Public Health. 14-15 September 2019 he was going to be here in Tulbagh (Rural Area) to Facilitate National Health Insurance Workshop, unfortunately he couldn't and it is very sad indeed and the workshop has been postponed for 28 September 2019 Long live the spirit... Tulbagh has Established active Health Structures namely Treatment Action Campaign and a number of people joined People's Health movement within our rural area. I will be attending the short course offered by International People's Health University in November because of him the Health movement continues... Hambakahle Comrade

Eduardo Espinoza
Asociación Latinoamericana de Medicina Social y Salud Colectiva. PHM-Latinoamerica
[email protected]
David Sanders in El Salvador DAVID Sanders, a fighter for the right to health of the peoples, of South African origin, died on August 30, 2019 at night. His physical disappearance shocked us deeply and filled us with sadness. Soon after, messages of condolence began to arrive from all over the world, which helped to alleviate our deep sense of nostalgia, regret and bewilderment. I met him in December 2000, in Bangladesh at the first People's Health Assembly (PHA-1), organized by the People's Health Movement (MSP / PHM) From then on, we were excellent friends and comrades who fully agreed on our ideological and political convictions. Thereafter we always meet again, with each new MSP People's Health Assembly, in the most remote places on the planet. Additionally, the coincidence in concerns and ideals evolved, as was natural, towards the shared development of multicenter research projects, together with researchers such as Ron Labonte, Roman Vega, Angelita Elias, Francoise Barten, Mario Róvere and other academics committed to the struggle for the right to health. This research generated important evidence to strengthen the struggle for the health of peoples and also gave us the pleasure of continuing to find and share experiences of struggle and hope. Especially valuable was to continue cultivating a strong friendship. One consequence being his presence in El Salvador in 2009. On that occasion we were fortunate that David visited us in the days before we joined the new FMLN government in El Salvador. With him we made a deep analysis of the health situation in the country, we validated and enriched the health proposal that we had already conceived, and identified the possibilities of support offered by the People's Health Movement to strengthen the process of Health Care Reform which was about to start in El Salvador. Thus was the seed of what would later become invaluable fruits in terms of training of community leadership and health personnel in the country, was sown in El Salvador through the UISP courses, which were held continuously for 8 generations with the most prestigious and committed academics of the MSP and ALAMES. El Salvador and the entire humanity acquired with this giant of Public Health is a debt that we have not yet been able to estimate. It is undoubtedly an irreparable loss for those of us who knew him, shared and worked with him. It is also for all the excluded, the poor and the marginalized to whom he dedicated his life and his work. May Mother Earth, whom he loved so much, be mild and generously welcome him in her bosom! Amandla Ngawethu!

Anne-Emanuelle Birn
University of Toronto
[email protected]
David Sanders was a beacon for the health left with an indomitable soul and spirit ~ ever acute in his political analysis, unflinching in speaking truth to and about power, and enormously generous and supportive in his mentoring of students, activists, and colleagues. What a privilege it has been to have witnessed his deep commitment to health justice, mostly from afar, and how awe-inspiring to see him, on a few occasions, in up close. Regretting that David left us when he still had so much to give, but appreciative of his legacy and tenacity, which will continue to resonate…

Alan Whiteside
Balsillie School and Professor Emeritus, University of KwaZulu-Natal
[email protected]
A giant of a man. His contribution to making the world more just was considerable and we have the task to continue it. So saddened by this news.

Sarah Khan
PHM UK
[email protected]
So sorry to hear such sad news about David. He was and always will be a huge inspiration for so many people. May he rest in peace always.

Julie Cliff
Faculty of Medicine, Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique
[email protected]
I read with shock and disbelief of David’s untimely death. Not so long ago, he had us laughing with relief as he told the story of his narrow escape from death after an attack by a swarm of wasps while fishing. No laughing now. I first met David in the early 1970s at a meeting in London of medical solidarity activists for the Mozambican, Angolan and Guinea Bissau (GAMMA) independence movements. Since those early days, David has never wavered in his commitment to political activism for health. He has combined brilliant analysis with a capacity to build – the nutrition programme in newly independent Zimbabwe, the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa, the People’s Health Movement internationally. The list goes on. In Mozambique, we remember the links he forged between the School of Public Health and the Community Health Department at Eduardo Mondlane University. Let his example as an internationalist live on.

Roger Ciza
HHNB& PHM Burundi
[email protected]
A devastating and sad news! May his soul Rest in Eternal Peace! Roger

Susan Michaels-Strasser
Columbia University
[email protected]
Rest in peace David. The world has lost a gem- a man who lived and breathed social justice and an option for the poor. His development of primary health care systems in Zimbabwe 30+ years ago were a model of excellence and the vision of Alma Ata. He was a steadfast leader in South Africa building public health training and public health programs routed in both the science and art of health and healing. We mourn a visionary, teacher and colleague. Let us continue to fight for health justice and primary health care. #thestruggleforhealth

Godfrey Philimon
People's Health Movement Tanzania
[email protected]
I don't see enough words to describe David Sanders for how he helped spark my career that I live on up to this day. In 2010 after completing my Bachelor Degree in Political Science and Public Administration at the University of Dodoma in Tanzania, I realised the health component has been of my interest especially when the communities do not understand their rights to health. While in the confusion as a new graduate, I met David on June 2012 when I had the opportunity to participate in the International People’s Health University (IPHU) training course (The Struggle For Health) which was followed by the Third People’s Health Assembly (PHA3). I feel very lucky and blessed to meet David in my life because he fulfilled my dream and opened my mind through that training session. I do remember the course was run by two weeks at the University of the Western Cape, led by the School of Public Health of which David is the Founder. From the training, when I returned home to Tanzania I kept in touch with him about how we could establish the People’s Health Movement Tanzania Circle. David is a very loving person because he loved to see his talents, knowledge, education, skills, professions, expertism and creation of what he believes continue to grow in other nations to save of this world. He supported me to establish the health movement country circle under the global health movement known as the People's Health Movement (PHM) and I am currently the health activist and advocate by professional, PHM Tanzania Country Coordinator and a human rights activist. I know David saw my passion that is why he has been very forward on guiding and advising me on many professional issues about my career as a health rights activist and PHM Country Coordinator in Tanzania. He has been one of the people on my list especially when I need to be recommended for my career or studies. I can't finish all that David did to help and support me rise up, I only continue to pray to God to forgive him of his human mistakes (if any) and to rest him in a good peace. Rest In Peace David Sanders, Long Live David Sanders.

Francisco Ferreira Songane
Retired UN official (WHO/UNICEF), former Minister of Health of Mozambique
[email protected]
Very sad news indeed. He was a GIANT. David was a symbol of continuous innovation and learning, extremely dedicated to public health with a drive to serve all without discrimination, and always preserving his verticality, even in circumstances when almost everyone seemed to be giving up under pressure from agendas aiming at circumverting the principles of public health. A strong advocate of the right to health, a leader in international health issues, consistent in his ideas, solid, someone to rely on. Nowadays, we are getting fewer and fewer people with this character at a time they are needed the most as we address UHC challenges in moving towards the 2030 Goals. May his thinking be always stuck on the back of our minds as an inspirational source to hopefully achieve Health for All. Condolences to his Family, all our Brothers in South Africa, and the whole Public Health Familiy worldwide.

STEVE MACK
new york
[email protected]
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Zizipho Norubela
UJ DFC SASCO AND DENOSA SM
[email protected]
May his soul rest in eternal peace. We're very humbled to have benefited from his knowledge. He has played a huge role in unpacking the NHI with PSI YW and we'll forever miss his humble soul for his contribution to our struggle as we continue to fight for justice in the health sector. A true soldier has fallen✊ Rest in Power Leader.

Lovey Mbonani
SAMWU (PSI YOUNG WORKERS)
[email protected]
May his revolutionary soul rest in perfect peaceMay his Revolutionary Soul RIP . .. We shall continue fighting championing for a Universal Health Coverage for the people of SA the poor in particular..

Godfrey Philimon
People's Health Movement Tanzania
[email protected]
Tributes for David Sanders: The death of former President Mugabe when we are still mourning the death of our beloved Prof. Sanders reminds me of one story Prof. David told me when having a dinner in Geneva during the 7Oth World Health Assembly (WHA70) 2017. Years ago, David went to Zimbabwe from South Africa where he lived with his family. He came in with his friend (I don't remember the name he told me) for a seminar and workshop. In the middle of the operation he came to be told by his close friends that there were clues by the Zimbabwean government to arrest him. There he gave up everything he had been doing and started traveling through the rats-way back to South Africa. Having arrived in South Africa but never arrived yet home. News Reports started circulating in the media in Zimbabwe and South Africa that David and his team are being hunted by the Zimbabwean government and all borders are closed so they cannot cross. He says he won't forgot the shock he experienced at home especially his wife and family members. He ended the story but told me, as an activist I should be very careful with friends because friends are your eyes and sometimes your enemies. However, don't be afraid of what I end up defending and especially if it contains facts and evidence. It really captured my imagination this David's story. Long Live David Sanders.

Peter Delobelle
University of the Western Cape / Unviversity of Cape Town
[email protected]
Strange how I always thought that David would never come to pass. A man of his stature simply seemed to be invincible. Always on the lookout for his critical comments and words of advice, it never occurred to me that one day we would have to face the fact that this was not a given, and that we should be grateful for every minute he spent with us, somewhere quietly observing in a corner waiting for the right time to raise his hand and display his wisdom in ways that would inevitably impress but also leave us with a smile. David was not a man of many words - but when he spoke you could hear a pin drop. Straight to the core but also straight from the heart, a man of great intellect but also wit, fun to be with and confronting at the same time. His concern about the wellbeing of his fellow men and his activism, but also modesty inspired me tremendously and played a huge role in my decision to move to this country that he loved so much, in order to join the struggle for a better life and Health for All. He will be sorely missed and I feel privileged to have known him as a colleague and friend. RIP David and thank you for all you have done for us.

Peter Delobelle
University of the Western Cape / Unviversity of Cape Town
[email protected]
Strange how I always thought that David would never come to pass. A man of his stature simply seemed to be invincible. Always on the lookout for his critical comments and words of advice, it never occurred to me that one day we would have to face the fact that this was not a given, and that we should be grateful for every minute he spent with us, somewhere quietly observing in a corner waiting for the right time to raise his hand and display his wisdom in ways that would inevitably impress but also leave us with a smile. David was not a man of many words - but when he spoke you could hear a pin drop. Straight to the core but also straight from the heart, a man of great intellect but also wit, fun to be with and confronting at the same time. His concern about the wellbeing of his fellow men and his activism, but also modesty inspired me tremendously and played a huge role in my decision to move to this country that he loved so much, in order to join the struggle for a better life and Health for All. He will be sorely missed and I feel privileged to have known him as a colleague and friend. RIP David and thank you for all you have done for us.

Godfrey Philimon
People's Health Movement Tanzania
[email protected]
I don't see enough words to describe David Sanders for how he helped spark my career that I live on up to this day. In 2010 after completing my Bachelor Degree in Political Science and Public Administration at the University of Dodoma in Tanzania, I realised the health component has been of my interest especially when the communities do not understand their rights to health. While in the confusion as a new graduate, I met David on June 2012 when I had the opportunity to participate in the International People’s Health University (IPHU) training course (The Struggle For Health) which was followed by the Third People’s Health Assembly (PHA3). I feel very lucky and blessed to meet David in my life because he fulfilled my dream and opened my mind through that training session. I do remember the course was run by two weeks at the University of the Western Cape, led by the School of Public Health of which David is the Founder. From the training, when I returned home to Tanzania I kept in touch with him about how we could establish the People’s Health Movement Tanzania Circle. David is a very loving person because he loved to see his talents, knowledge, education, skills, professions, expertism and creation of what he believes continue to grow in other nations to save of this world. He supported me to establish the health movement country circle under the global health movement known as the People's Health Movement (PHM) and I am currently the health activist and advocate by professional, PHM Tanzania Country Coordinator and a human rights activist. I know David saw my passion that is why he has been very forward on guiding and advising me on many professional issues about my career as a health rights activist and PHM Country Coordinator in Tanzania. He has been one of the people on my list especially when I need to be recommended for my career or studies. I can't finish all that David did to help and support me rise up, I only continue to pray to God to forgive him of his human mistakes (if any) and to rest him in a good peace. Rest In Peace David Sanders, Long Live David Sanders.

Walter Loening
University of Cape Town
[email protected]
It is good to have this opportunity to pay tribute to David, a man of considerable renown and held in high esteem, not only by academic colleagues but also by those working towards uplifting the disadvantaged. David and my friendship goes back to the mid-1980s when he invited several of us from South Africa to a community health conference in Harare. It was an extraordinary event where David had brought in the many of those with whom he had worked in the very young Zimbabwe. Accommodation was scarce but he manged to cater for everyone at this very productive event. Already then we admired him for what he had already achieved regarding health care for and with the community. David had seen the desperate need and rose to the challenge. In due course I realized that he thrived on this type of challenge and invariably seemed to find ways and means to meet obstacles. We worked side by side for a year at the University of KZN where he was appointed to the Deputy Deanship for Medical Education Development and student counseling. However, he needed a wider field and successfully established the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape. What a challenge veritably met yet again! His many publications and articles are well known; The Struggle for Health has probably become the foundation-stone for all students in the field of community health. I also offer my sincere condolences to Sue and her three children. Sue was the one who stood at David's side throughout tough and glorious times. Walter Loening Cape Town

Irwin Friedman
Sustainable Enterprise for Enabling Development
[email protected]
I am so deeply saddened. David, you were my friend, colleague and mentor. You enriched me and our country with profound and wise advice over many decades. Your were our lodestone in the march towards equitable, universal and quality Health for All based on the principles of Alma Ata. In these troubled times, we will miss your guidance. My heart goes out to your family, friends and comrades left behind. The struggle continues ...✨💥⚡️

Humphreys Nsona
Ministry of Health - Malawi
[email protected]
David was a humble, great and excellent human in building, supporting and creating opportunities for health. I first met David when he came on a mission to Malawi to lead a team on the evaluation of community case management, an intervention the country has just introduced as was at infancy. His insights and feedback then helped country team pull together approaches that would see community case management work as a comprehensive package. He was unique and offered guidance in several forums we met globally...We will miss him and his contributions. May his soul rest in peace

Mushtaque Chowdhury
BRAC University
[email protected]
The passing of David is an irreparable loss to the movement for people's health. David and I have been good friends since the 1980s. I first met him in London when I was studying for my PhD at LSHTM. I was struck by his knowledge and concerns on the issues of health faced by the poor and other disadvantaged groups, and his forceful plea to include them in the mainstream health policy discussions. He worked closely with Dr Zafrullah Chowdhury to organize the first PHA in Savar in 2000 and the PHM was born. In 2004, we invited David to a consultative meeting prior to the launching of the BRAC School of Public Health. His presence and contributions helped us to understand the ideas around community-based experiential learning which is now fully practiced at the School. He was a great exponent of learning from the people. In November 2018, the 4th PHA was organized in Savar again. A large number of foreign delegates were stranded at Dhaka airport and not being allowed entry for some miscommunications. David was terribly upset and contacted Sir Abed for help. BRAC's interventions solved the problem and all the delegates were granted entry and attended the meeting. I was pleasantly surprised to see in him the concerns. I met him again at the Prince Mahidol Conference in Bangkok in January last and he was so grateful for what BRAC did to make the PHA happen. He was a great soul. We will miss you Dear!

Emmanuel Tangumonkem
ACADI Cameroon/ PHM Cameroon
[email protected]
You lived with focus and you fought the battle tenaciously and unwavering. You greatly inspired me to choose the course I am presently on. I know that victory is sure. We won't hear the voice again when we shout out "AMANZA" but the memories will remain in our hearts. I will tell future generations about David the great, who laboured for the poorest of the poor to get access to basic health care. Adieu professor.

Matt Fisher
Southgate Institute, Flinders University
[email protected]
Thanks you David for your dedication to the causes of social justice and human wellbeing. I can hear your voice now, which always had such wise words to say, coming from a depth of commitment and experience over a lifetime.

David Bishai
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
[email protected]
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation called David to Seattle in 2015 to meet with the co-Chairs during a learn from the experts session devoted to primary health care. David delivered the most cogent explanation ever of the rationale for why comprehensive bottom up primary health care would help the foundation accomplish so many of the goals it had around the rubric of tech development and delivery. We lost him far too early, there is so much more work to do. We get to keep the inspiration he gave us and our realization of the truths he shared.

Wilson Asibu
Country Minders for Peoples Development
[email protected]
I knew David Saunders sometime back and lastly met him during the International Peoples Health University (IPHU2018) in GK and PHA-4. I admired him for his deep understanding of health issues and their determinants and his fearlessness and bluntness. He will be greatly missed

Jan De Maeseneer
Ghent University
[email protected]
I met David for the first time in 1995 in Cape Town. He was an inspiring person,and later he took the floor in many meetings to defend equity, social justice, to fight povety, ..and to stress the impirtance of social determinants of health. David was not only a global thinker, but also a Global Activist in PHM. Last year, he gave a wonderful key-note at the Ntwork Towards Unity for Health Conference in Limerick: committed, passionate, ... My condolences to David's family. Prof Jan De Maeseneer, Former Secretary-General, The Network: TUFH (2007-2015)

Jadranka Mustajbegovic
Academy of Medical Sciences in Croatia
[email protected]
“Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal.” — Anonymous

Jerry Coovadia
Match
[email protected]
A comrade and esteemed friend in the world of public health and democracy. I considered him as one of the mentors I had in that perilous subject of health within the freedom struggle in South Africa.Kind ,offbeat and gentle, razor sharp in the analyses of policy and practice, irreplacebale!

Naadira Munshi
Public Services International
[email protected]
PSI pays tribute to the life of Comrade David Sanders PSI is shocked and saddened to hear of the passing of Comrade David Sanders on Saturday, 31 August 2019. A dedicated activist, academic and practitioner, Sanders was a globally renowned academic and health activist, and founding member of the People Health Movement. An emeritus professor at the University of the Western Cape’s School of Public Health, Sanders committed his life to the struggle for justice, and the struggle for health for all. Comrade Sanders was well known to PSI. We had worked closely with him in South Africa to fight for a People’s National Health Insurance scheme. And globally, we had initiated discussions with him for a detailed research work to critique the global “Universal Health Coverage” discourse and for strengthening policy advocacy and campaign for universal public health care. He will miss be sorely missed, particularly by the young workers in our affiliates who worked closely with him in South Africa for the People’s NHI campaign. Comrade Sanders had worked tirelessly to fight for a People’s NHI, and one which takes seriously the contribution of Community Health Workers in our health system. His contribution to PSI's National Health Insurance Task Team in which he brought a wealth of knowledge and experience cannot be overemphasized. We will continue to cherish this and are challenged to build on it. We send our sincere condolence to Sanders family, friends and comrades. We honour and celebrate his life that he committed to struggle and justice. Hamba Kahle Comrade David Sanders

Simrin Kafle
PHM Nepal
[email protected]
My heartfelt tribute to Prof. Dr. David Sanders, the legend of Public Health and People's Health Movement....Your guidance and contribution have always aspired all the activists from around the world to continue the struggle for health....We are indebted and will surely express our gratitude through our actions and spirit for equity and justice in health.... You are in my heart David... In solidarity, Simrin

Sharon Friel
Australian National University
[email protected]
David, thank you. You showed us how to bring together a deep concern for humanity and fairness through research, activisim and your every day practices. I will always cherish your constant support and encouragement. Rest in peace

Milin Sakornsin
Thai Health Promotion Foundation
[email protected]
Dear David, Thank you for all your lessons. I still recalled when you lectured me on how important primary health care to health promotion is. It is truly sad that I will never have any chance to listen to your intense debate anymore. Respectfully yours, Milin

Oscar Feo
ALAMES Venezuela
[email protected]
Conocimos a David como un luchador por el derecho a la salud y como un profesional íntegro. Lamentamos su partida, seguiremos su lucha.

Margarita Posada
Foro Nacional de Salud
[email protected]
Maestro y compañero perseverante, seguirás vivo en nuestras luchas, en cada una de ellas reivindicaremos tu memoria y a tu amor a la vida. HASTA LA VICTORIA SIEMPRE COMPAÑERO

Mary T Bassett
Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health
[email protected]
It was my daughter, now in her 30s, who sent an alarmed note to me with the news that David was gone. This source would probably have pleased David, as he worked to cross generational and so many other kinds of divides. I am from the US and grew up in New York City, but for many years Zimbabwe was home. I met David in 1985 when I had just finished my medical training, which is endless, and had decided that I should work in Africa. I was invited for an interview in Harare. That weekend David showed up at the gate. Ben was in the backseat and David said, “I thought you might like to see some places that you aren’t likely to be shown.” He took me to Mbare, the single men’s hostels, the market and so on. And so began the 17 years I would spend in Zimbabwe As for so many others who have written remembrances, David was a mentor and a friend. When I told him recently that he was the best boss I ever had, I think he thought I was joking- he didn’t carry himself as a “boss”- but it was true. As chair of Community Medicine at the University of Zimbabwe, he gave guidance and opened doors. He invited Leon Bijlmakers and me to join him in studying the impact of structural adjustment on health under the auspices of Peter Gibbon at the Nordic African Institute. His activism should not obscure from his commitment to research. David was determined that we make a statement- using our research skills- on this extremely damaging policy. He encouraged me to apply for academic promotion. I would probably have remained a junior lecturer. This selfless generosity was not special to me- it was replicated over and over again among the many he knew. I was honored to give the David Sanders lecture at the UWC SOPH, the institution he worked so hard to build. And, I should add, he was very funny. “Retirement” seemed not to have slowed David down. I often felt that we took him too often from his family. For Sue and his children Ben, Lisa and Oscar his death must be truly devastating. I am so sorry. We don’t get people like David Sanders very often: A fearless public intellectual and a good friend. The best way to honor him is to carry on his commitment to the struggle for health.

may haddad
phm
[email protected]
Lucky are the ones of us who have met you, our beloved David <3 Amandla Ngawethu! https://mayhaddad.wordpress.com/2019/09/01/amandla-ngawethu/

Rhali Aziz
Association marocaine des droits humains
[email protected]
Dear ALL C est une grande perte pour l activité des droits humains en général et le droit à la santé en particulier , pour commémoré David Sanders il faut continue sur les choix de David c est à dire le choix des droits .

David Oginga Makori
PHM-Kenya
[email protected]
The hand of cruel death has robed us, David Sanders. David was a mentor, father to the PHM family and loved by all. In public forums and lectures halls, He taught about inequities in the health system, and why community health workers mattered in every healthcare facility in every village. David courageously stood firm to promote primary healthcare, health equity, and health as a human right, and constantly engaged in social activism for communities whose health is compromised by injustice and inequality. ‘David you’ve fought the good fight, you’ve finished the race. May your soul rest in peace’.

Qamar Mahmood
International Development Research Centre (IDRC) da
[email protected]
This is indeed very sad news and a huge loss for global public health! I have known and worked with David since 2003 and have admired his work, passion and compassion. He had been a dear friend and a mentor. My condolences for his family and loved ones. I will miss him.

Camila Giugliani
PHM Brazil
[email protected]
In the name of PHM Brazil, I deeply thank David Sanders, for being our inspiration and example of an activist who has had the courage to fight injustices, always, and of a professor who has made the best use of his knowledge and academic achievements to bring light to the struggle for health for all. We will carry his teachings with us and will always miss him. He put on our hands the seed to plant PHM Brazil.

Denis Joseph Bukenya
Human Rights Research Documentation Center (HURIC)/PHMUGA
[email protected]
Fare well thee Prof. Sanders. A fallen combatant to be missed by all, a mentor to many and a comrade to all who has made it to the next world. Your selflessness for humanity has written your name in the history books of the greats and the works of your hand will be remembered for eternity. Professor Sanders’ words of poetic justice in health will now go down in history as wisdom that will challenge the living to carry on the fight of health for all to its logical conclusion if ever. These words still echo in our ears, linger in our hearts and envision in our efforts. You structured your every word of activism with such creativity and amazed me with such rich lessons on the right to health. I cannot count how many times I have visited your Library for wisdom as I commenced my activism business and the countless times I have borrowed leaf from your works. In your memory, I pledge to try to impose on the People’s Health Movement Uganda chapter the institution of a memorial lecture in Uganda that will emulate and re-echo your works and ideas to the PHM UGA activists. I will miss looking out for you every time I had a score to settle with the PHM global secretariat, your mentor-ship and guidance. The world has lost a reputable man and it is my prayer that we who subscribe to your activism ideology do not quay sail. Thank you Lord for the time accorded to us with Prof. Sanders and may his soul find rest and eternal peace, comfort to the family as we mourn your departure. Thanks Prof. Sanders.

Toby Freeman
Southgate Institute for Health, Society, and Equity, Flinders University
[email protected]
I had the extreme pleasure of working with David for a decade on comprehensive primary health care projects. He came to Adelaide often, and I always enjoyed wrangling his - I can see in the tributes - infamous slides, and helping him with his temporary Australian SIM card, or other technological issues. One of the last things we worked on together was his impact statement for a grant application, which described to me unfathomable achievements over the course of his life. Squeezing it into the character count requirement of the grant was a struggle. He will be sorely missed, personally, and politically.

Louis Reynolds
PHM South Africa
[email protected]
In my chaotic study, next to my office chair, is an empty dining room chair. I used to carry it in here whenever David rushed round to co-write an article or prepare a presentation. We would sit at my computer and argue about what the main message should be, quibble about fonts and text sizes and layout; add, reorder, and delete slides. It seemed to me that there were always too many slides, and David always disagreed. On the Thursday 8 days before he died we sat here working on a piece for the Daily Maverick. He was his usual self; finding the time time to get some gardening advice from Mary Jane and to joke with Nellie and check on her sugar intake. There was no sign that anything would happen to him; no indication that he would not always be around. And now he’s gone. He will never sit on that chair again. It will now always bear a kind of emptiness, as will I, and countless others who knew him. To me the most wonderful theme running through the many accolades to David that come flooding in is the way he influenced so many people’s lives. Even small children loved him instantly. He recognised immediately what made each one of them tick, and nurtured it in their games and the tricks they played and their conversations with him. Our grandchildren felt important when he was around. They will miss him deeply. Few people who had meaningful encounters with David came out unchanged. They saw themselves and the world, and their place in it, in a new light. They understood that they have power, and that they could use that power to change things, especially if they encouraged and mobilised others to join them. Many of them went on to do great things and to change the lives of others. And this ongoing cascade of bringing people to new insight and influencing others will be part of his enduring legacy and true to his utter and uncompromising dedication to make the world a better place for us and future generations to live in.

Bill Genat
PHM Australia
[email protected]
Homage to a global hero carrying the torch for comprehensive primary health care, a sword to cut through delusion and holding the flower of compassion, now cast into the beyond eternally emanating radiance and whole-sum-ness into the wider life of this planet - vale David, with deep gratitude.

Christa Cepuch
MSF (ex HAI Africa)
[email protected]
Prof Sanders was a hero to me and so many others. I did my MPH at the SOPH because of him. We have lost a giant in the world of public health and social justice. Rest in Peace and Power, Prof. With endless respect for your strength and commitment, Christa

Shuaib Manjra
UCT
[email protected]
A towering presence, an agile mind, expansive experiences, always principled, activist, academic, mentor to many. RIP David. We will miss you deeply.

Alexis Benos
PHM & IAHPE
[email protected]
dear David I understand that this is your ultimate joke... Nevertheless for the rest of us it is not even a bad joke. It is the unbearable reality, it is a shock for all of us knowing you as a beloved and close friend with affective feelings and sarcastic humour, as an inspiring leader of PHM and all the global movement struggling for health, or as the ideal combination of a respected academic with a grass roots movement militant comrade. All the above characteristics of your personality are making impossible filling the vacuum you are leaving with your absence in all respects. The international movement "struggling for health" will be, unfortunately, crucially affected. Your unquestionable leadership skills and mainly flair and inspiration will be greatly missed. The role model of an academic investing all his skills and stamina to the international movement is becoming gradually a precious quality very seldom present in all movements driven nowadays mainly by professional interests. Our longstanding friendship, which started from the 80's in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with both you and Sue, is violently disrupted with your undue departure. We promise you to keep our bounds with Sue and the kids. We promise you that, all of us - the militants struggling for health all over the world - will multiply our efforts in order to empower the movement that you dreamt of and determined its foundation and its up to now successful history, the People's Health Movement. Farewell my dear friend,

Ghassan Issa
Arab Resource Collective (ARC)
[email protected]
what an immense loss of an exceptional fighter for the right of all people every where to have health for all now. i met David in the year 2000 during the first PHA in Savar-Bangladesh, the establishing event of PHM. since then i never recall him resting for one second from the battle of the right for all now. watching him from a distance was always inspirational. Rest in peace comrade as the PHM continue the strive.

Mike Mbizvo
Population Council, privously WHO Director for Reproductive Health and Research
[email protected]
I worked with David at Harare Hospital in the 70s, and later the University of Zimbabwe Medical School at Parirenyatwa hospital. He later moved on to head the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape. Throughout, he displayed an extraordinary passion for alleviation of ill-health arising from social injustice and poverty. David, while a professional in public health, his life was that of a global icon and public health activist.

Shanti Raman
PHM Oz, PHAA
[email protected]
David Sanders was instrumental in getting me active and angry about global injustice in health. A giant of the People's Health Movement

Ronald Labonte
University of Ottawa
[email protected]
I began working with David around 2000 when we got involved in a critical assessment of the G8 countries health commitments. The upcoming Canadian-hosted 2002 G8 summit included a focus on Africa and the result of our study came out two years later as the aptly titled book Fatal indifference. Our collaborations continued over the years, perhaps most crazily with the PHM-initiated and IDRC funded study we co-led on Revitalizing Health for All, which culminated in another eponymously titled book based on the findings of over 20 research projects in almost as many countries. David would often smile in his patented way, shake his head, and wonder how we ever got involved in something quite so ambitiously mad. But we did, because the ‘struggle for health’, as those who knew David know, was his political and moral passion, one that he was so adept at sharing with others that it was impossible ever to say no to something David would ask you to do with him. He suffered poorly the business-as-usual rhetoric too often colonizing global health policy debates, and had a talent for humorously (or not, but always politely) knocking the stuffing out of a lame argument with a short phrase or two and a inviting shrug. He was also able to tell an amusing story at just the right time in tense PHM meeting. I was always taken with David’s ease in teaching (though I know he worked hard to create that ease), and with his ability to run through 150 slides in a 40-minute talk. A mentor, a friend, a colleague, a global leader, a tireless fighter for justice in health and against health injustices. He leaves big hole in our collective efforts to improve global health equity, a bigger personal hole in that place reserved for loving fondness, and I feel for Sue, his family, and all the other friends, colleagues, and global health activists whose lives he touched in almost magical ways. One small comfort I might take from his untimely death: That he spent some of his last hours engaging in something he often described as just slightly more important than the struggle for health – the struggle to hook (and then release) a fish, preferably a brook trout.

Nancy Krieger
Chair, Spirit of 1848 Caucus (American Public Health Association) and Professor of Social Epidemiology (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA)
[email protected]
When I was newly entering the field of public health in the mid-1980s, I was greatly influenced by David’s book “The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment” (London: MacMillian, 1985) – and the dedication (which I am reminding myself of now, as I hold his book in my hands) says much about his lifelong commitment to health justice: “This book is dedicated to the children of the poor in Zimbabwe and their mothers who made me learn something about the struggle for health.” Ever since, I looked to and learned from his ceaseless work & his critical contributions at meetings (including at WHO meetings regarding the work & follow-up for the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health), and likewise followed his many contributions to helping build the People’s Health Movement. May we all carry forward his memory, spirit, and commitments.

Desire Habonimana
People's Health Movement Burundi (PHM Burundi)
[email protected]
Dear Prof. David Sanders, Your love of humanity and your commitment to improving people’s health especially health of the poor are immortal. We will remain connected by heartstrings into infinity. Your bravery left an indelible imprint in our memories. May your soul Requiescat in pace!

Romeo Irankunda
PHM Burundi
[email protected]
I had the chance to meet David Sanders at PHA4 in Savar, Bangladesh. I still remember his inspiring presentation during PHA4. In his recent article published in the Lancet in August 2019, he warned of a further deterioration in the health of people on behalf of CSU. Great loss for the PHM and the world ... Sincere condolences . The fight for health will continue RIP Great Dav.

Alexis Benos
PHM & IAHPE
[email protected]
dear David I understand that this is your ultimate joke... Nevertheless for the rest of us it is not even a bad joke. It is the unbearable reality, it is a shock for all of us knowing you as a beloved and close friend with affective feelings and sarcastic humour, as an inspiring leader of PHM and all the global movement struggling for health, or as the ideal combination of a respected academic with a grass roots movement militant comrade. All the above characteristics of your personality are making impossible filling the vacuum you are leaving with your absence in all respects. The international movement "struggling for health" will be, unfortunately, crucially affected. Your unquestionable leadership skills and mainly flair and inspiration will be greatly missed. The role model of an academic investing all his skills and stamina to the international movement is becoming gradually a precious quality very seldom present in all movements driven nowadays mainly by professional interests. Our longstanding friendship, which started from the 80's in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with both you and Sue, is violently disrupted with your undue departure. We promise you to keep our bounds with Sue and the kids. We promise you that, all of us - the militants struggling for health all over the world - will multiply our efforts in order to empower the movement that you dreamt of and determined its foundation and its up to now successful history, the People's Health Movement. Farewell my dear friend,

Araya Medhanyie
Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
[email protected]
I had the opportunity to work with Prof. David on a research project for three years back in 2008/11. We published a paper and book chapter together. He was in Mekelle, Ethiopia (my home town) few months ago and we had a great time. So sad to hear this bad news. He was an amazing mentor. I have never seen a mentor as humblest as he is. His humanity and simplicity is beyond my words. He has influenced me in many ways. Oh..My dear Prof David, rest in peace, and my sincere condolences to his beloved family, colleagues and friends.

Araya Medhanyie
Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
[email protected]
I had the opportunity to work with him on a research project for three years back in 2008/11. We published a paper and book chapter together. He was in Mekelle, Ethiopia (my home town) few months ago and we had a great time. So sad to hear this bad news. He was an amazing mentor. I have never seen a mentor as humblest as he is. His humanity and simplicity is beyond my words. He has influenced me in many ways. Oh..My dear Prof David, rest in peace, and my sincere condolences to his beloved family, colleagues and friends.

Rhoderick Machekano
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation
[email protected]
Farewell David. You were a great human being. It was in 1991 when you first gave me chance to work in public health at the University of Zimbabwe Medical School. I will be forever grateful because that chance changed the course of my life. Meeting you last year in Cape Town after more than 25 years was an honor a farewell to note. RIP David - you fought a good fight for the well being of the human race.

Biram Ndiaye
UNICEF
[email protected]
I will always remember, Prof David Sanders contribution to create a critical mass of public health and nutrition specialists in Africa. My sincere condolences to David's family and friends. Biram

Alexis Benos
PHM & IAHPE
[email protected]
dear David I understand that this is your ultimate joke... Nevertheless for the rest of us it is not even a bad joke. It is the unbearable reality, it is a shock for all of us knowing you as a beloved and close friend with affective feelings and sarcastic humour, as an inspiring leader of PHM and all the global movement struggling for health, or as the ideal combination of a respected academic with a grass roots movement militant comrade. All the above characteristics of your personality are making impossible filling the vacuum you are leaving with your absence in all respects. The international movement "struggling for health" will be, unfortunately, crucially affected. Your unquestionable leadership skills and mainly flair and inspiration will be greatly missed. The role model of an academic investing all his skills and stamina to the international movement is becoming gradually a precious quality very seldom present in all movements driven nowadays mainly by professional interests. Our longstanding friendship, which started from the 80's in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with both you and Sue, is violently disrupted with your undue departure. We promise you to keep our bounds with Sue and the kids. We promise you that, all of us - the militants struggling for health all over the world - will multiply our efforts in order to empower the movement that you dreamt of and determined its foundation and its up to now successful history, the People's Health Movement. Farewell my dear friend,

Linda Mans
Manskracht
[email protected]
Thank you so much for your inspiration, David. My condolences for your family, friends, and the People's Health Movement.

Debbie Bradshaw
South African Medical Research Council
[email protected]
It is with great sadness that we heard of David's death over the week-end. Condolences to Sue and the children. David has made a major contribution through his critical thinking and passion for social justice in health - a legend in his own time. Hamba Kakuhle.

Andre-Jacques Neusy
Training for Health Equity Network: THEnet
[email protected]
We mourn the passing of David Saunders a colleague, an irreverent friend fierce in his fight for social justice, with little patience for pontificating experts in global health. He was a true cosmopolitan son of Africa totally dedicated to make health a universal right. Thank you David for all the great accomplishments you have made during your passage on earth. We miss you.

Andre-Jacques Neusy
Training for Health Equity Network: THEnet
[email protected]
We mourn the passing of David Saunders a colleague, an irreverent friend fierce in his fight for social justice, with little patience for pontificating experts in global health. He was a true cosmopolitan son of Africa totally dedicated to make health a universal right. Thank you David for all the great accomplishments you have made during your passage on earth. We miss you.

Nana Ama Frimpomaa Agyapong
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
[email protected]
It is extremely sad to learn that you are no more. We thank God for your life and the opportunity to know you and the great opportunity we have through your vision and hard work. Our deep condolences to your family. May your soul rest in peace

Barbara Hutton
SOPH
[email protected]
Condolences to David's family. What an honour it was to work with him, to be guided by him. He will be deeply missed.

Collins Abere Liko
Economic and Social Rights Centre-Hakijamii
[email protected]
It is indeed sad to have lost such a great mind and inspiration. Your legacy and passion for a healthy world informed by peoples struggles will live on. Rest in Peace comrade.

Denis Kibira
Coalition for Health Promotion and Social Development (HEPS-Uganda)
[email protected]
What a great loss it is to the entire fraternity of the People’s Health Movement. We shall miss your zeal for human rights. Your efforts have not been in vain. RIP David Sanders.

Nafis Faizi
Aligarh Muslim University
[email protected]
One of the biggest regrets of my life would be not knowing you earlier. Nevertheless, I will never forget your immense clarity and expertise in understanding public health and the advice that you gave in Kathmandu, and later at Savar. I am sure many of us would agree that your strong fundamentals and clear ideology was backed by incisive comments that have been immensely useful for the young (& not so young prefessionals). Few people would have the courage to work and deliver in areas of humanitarian crisis and speak truth to power. As I and my IPHU colleagues remember your Zimbabwe-South African excursions during difficult times, it still gives us goosebumps and reminds us of the immense strength, courage and determination that you had. I still believe that, 'The Struggle for Health' and 'Questioning the solution' are a must read books for any student of public health. I believe that the revised edition of the former still comes out. Thank you for your immense contribution and changing our lives and our approaches in Public Health. You will always be remembered and your inspiration will always enlighten us in the sontinuing struggle for health. Thank you David.

Salim Abdool Karim
CAPRISA
[email protected]
It is with deep sadness that we learnt of David's untimely passing. He was a stalwart in the struggle for health. Slim first met David when he was invited to speak at the Medical Students Clinical Conference at University of Natal Medical School in 1980. So many of the students were moved by his ideas and he left a lasting impression. We respected him both as an academic and an activist. An icon of the primary health care and health care worker movements, he has left an indelible mark on the world, with many of us committed to his ideals. He will be sorely missed. May his soul rest in peace. Slim & Quarraisha Abdool Karim

Peninah Khisa
PHM East and Southern
[email protected]
I was quite sudden with the demise of Professor Sanders, really death is cruel. I have known Sanders for few years, he was a great leader, a mentor and inspiration to many. I remember him saying “the struggle will never end until you die”. He was in the forefront in making sure comprehensive primary health care is achieved for all. As a region we have lost a father and a mentor whose legacy and knowledge he imparted on us will forever remain in our hearts. Shine on your way.

Ellen Shaffer
Center for Policy Analysis on Trade & Health (CPATH)
[email protected]
So very sorry to hear this news. David was always brimming with ideas and analysis about the economic, social & political forces that undermine equality in health & resources, & how to mobilize for progress. He was enormously gracious, generous & hospitable to Joe Brenner & me during our work in South Africa in 2006. We grieve to hear this untimely news, & send solidarity to his family, students & colleagues.

Nicholas Freudenberg
City University of New York School of Public Health
[email protected]
David was a friend, colleague and role model. His passionate commitments to social justice, public health scholarship, and making a difference in the world inspired me , my colleagues and my students. He always insisted both on having the best evidence possible for improving health equity--and making sure that evidence was used in the political arena to make changes. I will miss him and honor his life by continuing as best I can the work he championed.

Erick Otieno Owuor
Kamukunji Paralegal Trust (KAPLET)
[email protected]
Professor David Sanders is gone, but his spirit and vision will never be forgotten. He was a great mentor and a friend to many in the struggle for health. May his dream for health for all become a reality. Rest in eternal peace great hero!

Dr Abdoulaye KONE
Association Malienne pour la Défense du Droit à la santé
[email protected]
Nous avons rencontré la première fois à l'IPHU de Dakar de 2011. De cette date à son décès il n'a cessé à chaque rencontre de nous émerveiller, de nous capacités avec ses brillantes exposés dont le dernier était celui de Bangladesh. Une très grande perde pour la.santé mondiale

Linda Shuro
People's Health Movement Global
[email protected]
I am so glad to have known David. He was really committed to the struggle for health and making a difference at all levels. I really enjoyed his supervision when I studied for my masters and also working together within PHM to strengthen the movement in Africa. I am shocked by the news but I hope I can make a difference in the struggle for health having gained a lot from interacting with David. Zorora murugare David (Rest in Peace David).

Fran Baum
People's Health Movement (PHMOZ) & Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity, Flinders University
[email protected]
Farewell dear David. More than anyone I know you have been a warrior for global health justice. Always deeply insightful in your analysis of the global political economy and fearless in speaking truth to power. How many times have you stood up in an international forum and swum against the stream to point out the obvious injustices in the world? How many times have you challenged us on the PHM Steering Council and caused us all to stop, think and reconsider? How many times have you convinced young doctors and other health professional to consider more than just medical treatment? You’ve been my most important mentor and shown me how you can combine a successful academic career while also being a progressive health activist. I’m going to miss doing research and writing articles with you, thinking through problems and solving some of them, laughing together and being your PHM comrade. It is so hard to believe that you won’t be joining us as planned to speak at our symposium on the 16th September and to be the keynote speaker at two People’s Health Movement events in Adelaide and Sydney. Now sadly instead we will be paying tribute to your life’s work and the amazing impact you’ve made worldwide. You’d be amazed at the global outpouring of grief and sorrow on social media showing the deep affection in which you are held across the global by so many people. Thank you for 28 years of comradeship and wonderful friendship and for all I’ve learnt from you and the support I’ve received from you. Vale David and rest in peace knowing that you have inspired so many others who will pick up the struggle for health that you carried on throughout your life.

Krishna Shrestha
WHO
[email protected]
Saddened to hear the demise of the great public health leader, Your absence is a great loss for Public Health. May your soul rest in eternal peace

Kingsley Kwadwo Asare Pereko
Peoples Health Movement Ghana
[email protected]
Fare thee well Prof. Sanders. Not just another but a very great personality, selfless for humanity, a mentor and a comrade has made it to the next world. It is another moment in history where the living is challenged to carry the fight for health for all to the end. His voice for "health for all" still echo in our ears, minds and heart. He had a very nice way of putting across very sound and great ideas. He always amazed me with the great lessons on primary health care and health governance and was more of an open library anytime I encountered him. PHM Ghana will forever be grateful for his affection towards us. We will greatly miss his unofficial visits and meetings anytime he had a programme in Ghana. We look forward to instituting a memorial lectures in your name to carry your voice out and loud. The world country, family, PHM fraternity and PHM Ghana has lost a gem very hard to replace. Its our prayer the Lord find rest for your soul and comfort to the family as we mourn your departure. Thanks Prof. Sanders for a life so impactful.

Jennie Popay
University of Lancaster UK
[email protected]
What a tireless activist for social justice he was. What a terrible loss to us all in the international movement for equity in health. Thankfully he leaves behind a powerful legacy - the multitude of people around the world that he has inspired in so many ways. Thank you David. X

Kenneth Mwehonge
Coalition for Health Promotion and Social Development (HEPS Uganda)
[email protected]
As HEPS Uganda and PHM Uganda, we are still struggling to accept the sad news of the passing on of Prof. David Sanders. I met David in 2011 in Uganda and I was mesmerized by his humility, he was such a down to earth man. His been such an exemplary leader and mentor for many of us, we will dearly miss you David. Your legacy will forever live on. RIP

Dr. Dorothy Chinwendu Chanda
University of Zambia, School of Nursing Sciences.
[email protected]
It was really devastating to hear about the sudden death of this great intellectual who has given all of himself to ensure that every one acesses good health without exception. This he prooved through his passionate and active participaation in Universal Health Coverage , and PHC strategic activites. I still hold very dear your lectures on Determinants of health when we attended the PHM Assembly in Cape Town. We pray that the angels guide you safely to the bosom of our Lord Jesus Christ whom you saw in all things that you did as you transited this world. We pray for God's strength for your wife and family as they mourn your demise. MHSRIEP.

Dr. Dorothy Chinwendu Chanda
University of Zambia
[email protected]
It was really devastating to hear about the sudden death of this great intellectual who has given all of himself to ensure that every one acesses good health without exception. This he prooved through his passionate and active participaation in Universal Health Coverage , and PHC strategic activites. I still hold very dear your lectures on Determinants of health when we attended the PHM Assembly in CCape town. we pray that the angels guide you safely to the bosom of our Lord Jesus Christ whom you saw in all things that you as you transited this world. We pray for god's strength for your wife and family as they mourn your demise. MHSRIEP.

PHM-UGANDA
PHM-UGANDA
[email protected]
Prof David Sanders was such an Influential global academic and health activist known to many of us across the health advocacy spaces. Globally he was known as a passionate, critical thinker and a champion of health rights in the struggle for health. We are delighted that his life phenomenally impacted many lives especially in the PHM fraternity and the broader civil society. His contributions to many independence struggles in Africa, pronouncements against inequalities in health accessibility, exploitation and welfare distribution in societies are inerasable and will continue to be the cornerstone of our movement across the continents. It is a great loss to both us and the global arena. His wisdom and knowledge will always be passed on and he will live with us forever.

Pacôme Tomètissi
PHM West & Central Africa
[email protected]
Tribute to David Sanders: An African giant has gone Death has torn from the loves of his family, the people’s health and anti-globalization movement, a baobab creating as results a big emptiness. Tribute to a unique and irreplaceable African who dedicated his life to helping others. We are speechless to express our gratitude to this faithful friend, this guide that made us hope and believe in people’s health, and who has always been present and committed by our side until his last breath. We can individually and collectively be proud of one of our intrepid companions. His struggles, David led them with a characteristic firm conviction and openness. He was one of the pioneers of the struggle for health and human dignity in Africa, an activist like all of us are dying to be one day. A real giant of Africa! If David Sanders did not receive a Nobel Peace Prize, it may be that the world is not yet grateful enough to one of its ‘’artisans’’. But the health movement will still remember that in South Africa, there was not only Mandela or Desmond Tutu, there also was... David Sanders! The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the politics of underdevelopment, a book of influence David Sanders is an influential actor of the public health movement. His book The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment co-authored with Richard Carver in 1985 (Macmillan: UK) has influenced academics and civil society in the past three decades, including resistance to neoliberalism in health. In this book, the founder and former director of the School of Public Health at the University of Western Cape first demonstrated that the reduction in illness and premature mortality in UK has resulted from improved living standards and hygiene and only to a very limited extent from specific preventive measures and curative services. He went on to say that transplantation into low and middle income countries of the western health system is part of the broader process of expanding the capitalist system, adding that Western health systems are more concerned with the medical profession and the commercial interests rather than peoples well-being. According to him, far from improving health, these transplantations maintain the system that perpetuates poor development and health problems. Finally, he appealed to expatriate health workers to make available to their home country what they have learned so that primary health care will become the basis of health care systems and there will be more democracy and transparency in the management of health. One of the most beautiful tributes to the famous disappeared would be to read (or reread), understand and adopt this book of influence that fueled the anti-neoliberal protest in Africa and around the world. Sênoudé Pacôme Tomètissi, PHM West & Central Africa

Pacôme Tomètissi
PHM West & Central Africa
[email protected]
Tribute to David Sanders: An African giant has gone Death has torn from the loves of his family, the people’s health and anti-globalization movement, a baobab creating as results a big emptiness. Tribute to a unique and irreplaceable African who dedicated his life to helping others. We are speechless to express our gratitude to this faithful friend, this guide that made us hope and believe in people’s health, and who has always been present and committed by our side until his last breath. We can individually and collectively be proud of one of our intrepid companions. His struggles, David led them with a characteristic firm conviction and openness. He was one of the pioneers of the struggle for health and human dignity in Africa, an activist like all of us are dying to be one day. A real giant of Africa! If David Sanders did not receive a Nobel Peace Prize, it may be that the world is not yet grateful enough to one of its ‘’artisans’’. But the health movement will still remember that in South Africa, there was not only Mandela or Desmond Tutu, there also was... David Sanders! The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the politics of underdevelopment, a book of influence David Sanders is an influential actor of the public health movement. His book The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment co-authored with Richard Carver in 1985 (Macmillan: UK) has influenced academics and civil society in the past three decades, including resistance to neoliberalism in health. In this book, the founder and former director of the School of Public Health at the University of Western Cape first demonstrated that the reduction in illness and premature mortality in UK has resulted from improved living standards and hygiene and only to a very limited extent from specific preventive measures and curative services. He went on to say that transplantation into low and middle income countries of the western health system is part of the broader process of expanding the capitalist system, adding that Western health systems are more concerned with the medical profession and the commercial interests rather than peoples well-being. According to him, far from improving health, these transplantations maintain the system that perpetuates poor development and health problems. Finally, he appealed to expatriate health workers to make available to their home country what they have learned so that primary health care will become the basis of health care systems and there will be more democracy and transparency in the management of health. One of the most beautiful tributes to the famous disappeared would be to read (or reread), understand and adopt this book of influence that fueled the anti-neoliberal protest in Africa and around the world. Sênoudé Pacôme Tomètissi, PHM West & Central Africa

Michael Ssemakula
PHM-UGANDA
[email protected]
David was a man of character. I remember his last engagement with us in Uganda in July 2019, Inspired me to stand boldly and firm for what is right even in the face of compromise. He told me "even if the integrity of the African leaders has been bought through huge monies of multinational corporations, the few of us can remain in the right standing." The role David has played in advancing social justice in health globally is unforgettable. We shall forever miss him

Billy Mwangaza
PHM D.R Congo
[email protected]
David, c'est avec un cœur en larme que je suis entrain d’écrire ce message. Pourquoi tu doit partir? Tu es pour le @Phm DR Congo un mentor, un accompagnateur, un motivateur, un vrai acteur du changement, un exemple. Et pour moi tu reste mon Idole dans la lutte pour la Santé pour tous. La lutte que t'a commencé produit des fruits partout dans le monde et aujourd'hui nous te promettons que nous allons continuer sur la même ligne afin que les peuples du monde découvrent leur Droit à la Santé. Tu restera à jamais dans nos cœurs. Repose en Paix.

Felistus
PHM Zambia
[email protected]
This is such a terrible moment in my lifetime. Rest well Mr Saunders. I was so honoured and humbled to have met you and learnt a lot. You have left an unmatched legacy. Rest in peace in God's bosom. You ran your race amicably. Will never forget you. Condolences to the PHM Global, Africa and South Africa. It hurts.

Nicole Valentine
World Health Organization
[email protected]
Dear David, your presence, together with that of Amit Sengupta's, will be sorely missed on the global public health stage as we move into the new decade. I remember with fondness your participation in and contributions to the World Health Organization Commission on Social Determinants of Health. The struggle for health justice, for which you stood for so long, must go on. But your voice will be very much missed.

Andreas Wulf
medico international
[email protected]
Dear all, such a big loss! My condolences to his family and friends in South Africa and the comrades in the wide People's Health Movement. And i will miss most the wit and humour of our comrade David, who loved to celebrate after intense conference days while he was cracking jewish jokes , one more hilarious than the other. Now we will never hear him laugh again! RIP, David! Andreas

Dieter Mueller
medico international
[email protected]
Dear friends and comrades Please accept and share with David’s family, friends and colleagues our deepest sympathy for this sensible loss. As Andreas already stated “such a big loss! And I will miss most the wit and humour of our comrade David, who loved to celebrate after intense conference days while he was cracking jewish jokes, one more hilarious than the other. Now we will never hear him laugh again! RIP, David!“ I had the privilege to meet David in the early 90tis, in Palestine, at the IPHC conference. My salute “David presente”, as our Latin American comrades use to say to commemorate somebody who we will never forget and who will always be with us and our common struggle. Dieter and all colleagues at medico international Germany

David Legge
People's Health Movement
[email protected]
Farewell dear friend. I will miss you in so many different times and places. I will miss being with you: chatting around the Amarula; tussling over text; chewing over strategy. I will miss watching you charm the high fliers while warmly supporting the rest of us. I will miss you in meetings: multi tasking - always multitasking - and then offering a breakthrough around the issue which was holding us up. I will miss your presentations: fiddling with your slides until the last moment; showing yet again the slide about the Japanese cow or the one about comprehensive PHC; and then speaking slowly and clearly and conveying complex ideas in the simplest of ways. I will miss the stories of research initiatives which you have led: the documentation of structural adjustment in Zimbabwe; tracking the turds; and the empty pantries. I will miss our conversations about the continuing relevance of earlier struggles, including Trotsky versus Stalin. I will miss the ethical compass which you were for all of us, epitomised perhaps by the Palestinian scarf that you seemed to wear at all our rallies. I will miss your humour: always engaging and inclusive. But most of all I will miss the assurance of knowing that you were there, somewhere: guiding, supporting, listening, inspiring. Thank you dear friend, for everything, including but so much more than, The Struggle for Health.

Renée de Jong
Wemos
[email protected]
It was a real honor to learn from David during the WHO watch in Geneva! Truly inspiring. My condoleances to all his loved ones and friends from the People's Health Movement.

Barbara Fienieg
Wemos
[email protected]
Such sad news, a kind person and a fierce defender of the right to health, such a loss to the world. Heartfelt condolences! Barbara Fienieg

Komakech Job
Center for Health, Human Rights and Development
[email protected]
You looked beyond yourself and fought for those who can not fight for themselves. Rest in peace

Itai Rusike
Community Working Group on Health (CWGH) and PHM Zimbabwe
[email protected]
I salute David for the man that he was and mentor to many. This was the greatest guy in public health! He fought the good fight, the struggle for health! May we take up his mantle and reach the finishing line for PHC. We are richer for having known one as great as David and may God rest his soul

Garance Upham
WAAAR
[email protected]
Very sad indeed. My first talk with him in a café in Geneva had convinced me then to join and work with PHM, right after a public talk with Claudio Shuftan.. Through David i became convinced that PHM had brought together brilliant minds. Over 15 years I always found David to be a free thinker with such a deep committment to equality that he never fell into the trap of fads. And again this May he was outstanding on Climate Change with his comment from the floor that it is corporations and not individuals who can make the difference! (G2H2, pre-WHA event. Geneva). We are sad indeed! Let all those committed to EQUALITY keep up the fight for social and economic justice!

Thomas Schwarz
G2H2 / MMI
[email protected]
David was an authority, in many ways. When he called for a “New International Economic Order” (Astana 2018), when he challenged the way the WHO Code of Practice on the international recruitment of health personnel avoided to address the issue of compensation, when he challenged the shortcomings of universal health “coverage” , this was not just fancy advocacy, but rooted in his biography, knowledge, personality. At the Geneva Global Health Hub and in our meetings and Assemblies, we could never expect from him an easy “yes”, but rather a challenging question – which pushed us to work harder to get him on board. The teacher is gone. He will be missed by many. My condolence for his family, friends, and the People's Health Movement.

Maziko Matemba
Health and Rights Education Programme (HREP)
[email protected]
Am at loss of words to lose the regend in the struggle for health will forever remember Prof David Sanders for believing in us as CSOs as game changers in public health Rest Well Prof we will continue the struggle for health as you taught us....Maziko Matemba In Malawi

G Srinivasa Rao
JSA - India
[email protected]
Met him 1st time in Dhaka during PHA and seen his presentation on global health issues and movement. Committed and worked for primary healthcare. Lost a great personality who is instrumental in advancement of health movements and global coordination with another stalwart com Amit Sen Gupta whom we lost very recently. Let us committee ourselves to carry forward their legacy and sustain struggles for equitable health.

Akif Akalin
Sinifin Sagligi
[email protected]
A tribute for David Sanders in Turkish (published yesterday). http://haber.sol.org.tr/blog/sinifin-sagligi/akif-akalin/david-sandersi-yitirdik-269519 http://toplumcutip.blogspot.com/2019/09/david-sanders-yitirdik.html

Akif Akalin
Sinifin Sagligi
[email protected]
A tribute for David Sanders in Turkish (published yesterday). http://haber.sol.org.tr/blog/sinifin-sagligi/akif-akalin/david-sandersi-yitirdik-269519 http://toplumcutip.blogspot.com/2019/09/david-sanders-yitirdik.html

Devaki Nambiar
George Institute for Global Health
[email protected]
A towering figure was Prof Sanders, keenly aware of politics, fearless, clear-headed, firm, and deeply compassionate. There was so much left to learn for so many of us and like Amit, we look to our memories and his legacy for courage and direction.

Wim De Ceukelaire
Viva Salud
[email protected]
The global movement of people’s health activists has lost a giant, a warrior, a hero. Today’s news of David Sanders’ death is devastating for comrades and friends in the struggle all over the world. He was a mentor to all of us and combined a scientist’s boundless passion for facts with an activist’s absolute intolerance to injustice. Because of this rare combination of talents he could be merciless for the powerful, to whom he stood up whenever he had the occasion, but he could also be extremely patient and compassionate for the poor, the young, the powerless. Whenever he took the floor and grabbed a microphone, you knew people in high places became uncomfortable. When he bowed over to someone in the street, in a restaurant or in someone’s home, you knew he was really interested in the smallest details of people’s lives. He was one of a kind. David Sanders was also a true friend with whom I enjoyed working and building the global People’s Health Movement. I spent hours with him in serious and sometimes heated discussions but I also shared countless lighter moments. I’ll cherish the memories: The 2010 soccer World Cup final, the bottles of Amarula in various hotel rooms, the dinners at our place in Brussels, his consoling words after the untimely death of our comrade Amit Sengupta, his jokes about our adventures in Dakar in 2011 as well as his rousing speeches and insightful presentations in so many places. His life was devoted to the struggle for health for all. The struggle for health was his life. The best way to honour him, is to make it ours as well. Amandla Ngawethu!

Tributes for Prof. David Sanders
Tributes for Prof. David Sanders

Write your tributes for Prof. David Sanders

It is with extreme sadness that we announce the passing away of our comrade Prof. David Sanders, a beloved colleague, friend, mentor and activist. David passed away on 30th August after a heart attack. He was a founding member of People’s Health Movement (PHM) in 2000 in Savar, Bangladesh and has been the co-chair of PHM from past six years.

David Sanders was a Professor and founding Director of the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape (UWC), South Africa. He was a specialist paediatrician with postgraduate qualifications in Public Health, and had over 40 years experience in health policy and program development in Zimbabwe and South Africa. David had extensive experience in the areas of primary health care, child health and nutrition, and human resources for health as part of health systems development.

He had published extensively in these fields, as well as on the political economy of health, including on structural adjustment and development aid, having authored or co-authored three books: “The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment”, “Questioning the Solution: the Politics of Primary Health Care and Child Survival” and “Fatal Indifference: the G8, Africa and Global Health”, in addition to many chapters and journal articles.

He was on the Steering Committee of the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition from 2002 – 2006, and a member of the Knowledge Network of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health. He was a founder member of the UK Politics of Health Group, of the International People’s Health Council and of PHM. He was a managing editor of Global Health Watch 2.

The untimely demise of David is an irreparable loss to all of us personally, David’s family, and for the broader health movement globally and in South Africa. We offer our condolences and solidarity to David’s wife Sue Fawcus, and his children Lisa, Oscar and Ben. PHM-Global and PHM-South Africa will continue to carry forward David’s vision of strengthening the people’s health movement towards health for all.

Thank you David

TRIBUTE MESSAGES


Prof. Marc van der Putten
Faculty of Public Health, Thammasat University, Thailand
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Shocked by the news that David passed away... I met David the 1st time over 20 years back at a Public Health Schools without Walls meeting. His amazing insights and critical appraisal of determinants of the public’s health were fueled by his intellect, his genuine concern and his ability to learn from those at the grassroots. We will miss you David!

Prof. Marc van der Putten
Faculty of Public Health, Thammasat University, Thailand
[email protected]
Shocked by the news that David passed away... I met David the 1st time over 20 years back at a Public Health Schools without Walls meeting. His amazing insights and critical appraisal of determinants of the public’s health were fueled by his intellect, his genuine concern and his ability to learn from those at the grassroots. We will miss you David!

Sangnim Lee
On behalf of "Services for the Health in Asian and African Regions (SHARE)", Japan
[email protected]
David inspired the world in significant global health issues including PHC, SDH, Nutrition and Child Health. We, David's friends in Japan will never forget David. Thanks so much David!! An international health NGO, "Services for the Health in Asian and African Regions (SHARE) released Tributes for David in SHARE's website below. It includes special memorial messages from David Werner. https://share.or.jp/opinion_advocacy/news/_david_sanders_werner.html

Maria Hamlin Zuniga
PHM Latn Ameriaca
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A tribute to David Sanders. Maria Hamlin Zuniga I want to share some experiences from the years leading up to the establishment of the Peopñles Health Movement in the year 2000, especially for those of the younger generation of PHM that should learn more about the prehistory of health activism. David Sanders and I met in the early 80s when he was doing some work with David Werner. We shared a common history of human rights and civil rights struggles: David in Africa and I in the US and Central America. We shared a common commitment to the Alma Ata Declaration and the concept of comprehensive primary health care and the training of community based health workers. We were both radical activists for Health for All. We had a dream of PHC in societies in transition. In the late 80s we were trying to organize a small international meeting of health activists involved in liberation struggles around the world. But before we could actually have the meeting we lived the reality of the fall of the Berlin wall and the defeat of the Sandinista Popular Revolution in Nicaragua where I was living and working. In late 1991 we had our meeting of activists from societies in transition, not to our socialist dream, but to societies facing neoliberal policies and severe structural adjustment programs. That international meeting resulted in the formation of a small network of health activists and academics with a radical position on PHC and Health for All. For a decade that network, the International Peoples Health Council, IPHC, organized and/or participated in international meetings around the world: an IPHC meeting in Palestine in 1993, then in South Africa after apartheid. We shared our particular points of view at the World Health Assembly, at the Copenhagen Social Development Summit, at the UN meetings in Cairo and Beijing. And also in meetings in Malaysia, the Philippines, India and Australia. During the early years of IPHC the small new network was able to develop analysis useful for organizing around the world. The book “Questioning the Solution” by David Sanders and David Werner was and important tool for academics and for community health workers. David Werner and I spent two sessions with David Sanders at the University of Western Cape Summer School programs doing workshops on Child to child methodology. That was just great getting the diverse students to see the importance of involving children in health education and promotion. It was a challenge getting the kids on to the campus, because the insurance program did not cover young children. But we did it and had a great time. We were thankful to David for inviting us, and to the faculty and students for teaching us so much about South Africa and the struggle for health there. At a meeting in 1997 in Penang, we decided, together with Consumer International and other organizations, to have a People's Health Assembly in 2000 to demonstrate to the world that the Alma Ata promise of Health for All by the year 2000 was a was never met . And to do so we set up and organizing committee with 7 other organizations to decide on the time, place and content of the first PHA. After much discussion we decided on GK in Savar, Bangladesh as the site because of the long history of GK in the commitment to the Alma Ata Declaration. The IPHC activists committed to developing the wonderful organizing materials for preparing for the first assembly. From 1997 until December of the year 2000 I worked with David as the only woman on the core organizing committee of the fist PHA. That was not an easy task. There were not that many outspoken feminist activists in communty health at that time. That came later. There still are not enough feminist activists in the PHM today. This is a call out to all you young women to get more involved. After PHA I most of the IPHC members became key figures in the new movement that was agreed upon at the Assembly….. And so we continue until today. I hope that the PHM activists of today have learned a bit more about David and about our prehistory. Now it depends on you the younger spirited activists to carry on this important and essential work of the struggle for health.

Simon Wright
Save the Children
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David was a titan and we will miss his voice in global health discussions. He was always ready to challenge cant and unexamined orthodoxies, to tease but always with humour. He had enormous energy to keep fighting for what is right and we cannot afford to lose voices like his.

Carmen Baez
PHM Argentina
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I met David Sanders in South Africa in the period immediately post-Apartheid when we were building a new universal health system for all. I remember the first years listening at conferences and meetings to his clear and powerful message about the strategy of Primary Health Care, community participation, intersectoral approach, social determinants of health and other concepts. I had arrived from Mozambique with experience of a socialist health system based on PHC with very little knowledge about other systems beyond my own experience. In those days I was working for the Gauteng Health Department and my boss and comrade, Dr. Rafik Bismilla, offered me the opportunity to attend a meeting in Cape Town related to the “progressive“ approach to health. I got to understand a while later that this was a preparatory African meeting towards the foundation of the People’s Health Movement. I was delighted to meet people who, on reflection today, influenced my life forever: David Sanders who had already impressed me as I said; David Werner who wrote “Where there is not doctor”, a book widely distributed in Mozambique; and Zafrullah Chowdhury, who wrote a book about the politics of drugs in Bangladesh, an issue that I did not fully understand at the time. The 3 days meeting made a huge impact on me because, for the first time, I was understanding clearly the power struggle in the health field. After the meeting, I took on the task of mobilizing organizations and individuals to go to the meeting in Bangladesh. I differed with Dave on some issues; he was not very convinced to bring on board government officials although they had been anti-apartheid activists before. In retrospect, he was right; most of them were absorbed by the system and did not support the PHM work for long. In December 2000 in Bangladesh, a quite small South African delegation was part of the first Peoples’ Health Assembly. There I was able to appreciate the role of David as a global activist; every time he spoke I observed people identifying with his messages about the contesting power structures, the medical hegemony, the importance of defending the PHC principles of Alma Ata, and the arguments for building a movement from the bottom up. From then on we were comrades in a newborn global health movement and continued to be until his passing. Back home, both of us started to build up the PHM in SA; he did it through his academia and other networks, and I by distributing the PHM Charter in every work meeting where I could try to recruit new sympathizers. I believe that the PHM today is a strong and respected civil society voice in SA thanks to his persistent and visionary work. The following years we became also colleagues with David, sharing joint projects between HST were I worked and SPH team led by him. His professional experience as a pediatrician in rural areas treating malnourished children enriched his academic inputs on these projects to improve the life of children. At the same time, I decided to do my MPH at UWC at the School of Public Health newly founded by David and others and I enjoyed each subject and appreciated the methodology and the progressive approach taught. The winter and summer schools of the distance course were crucial to reach more people and provide them with the tools and knowledge to convert them into public health workers and managers. This was the essence of David’s vision, so practical and appropriate in this phase! He became the tutor of my mini thesis about the Cuban medical mission in SA, he played this role with the impartiality and scientific rigor characteristic of David. Since I returned to Argentina after exile, I kept contact with David personally and through PHM. He came three times to Argentina in the last years, one with Susan. Recently, we had the pleasure of a visit by David again, this time invited by one the member organizations of the PHM Argentina, the Family Doctor’s/PHC doctors Association, to their annual congress. The Argentinian participants at the last PHA in Bangladesh in 2018 were impressed by him (like me many years ago), and were very kind to have him here with us. So, I was asked to facilitate his participation. It was difficult to find dates but finally he came and he even went to Patagonia for a couple of days for some trout fishing, one of his passions. We were happy that young participants, amongst them my son Pablo Rall, who acted as his translator, had the opportunity to get to know one of the icons in the struggle for health for all in the world and heard his strong message to keep aloft the banner and continue to defend the principles and vision of Alma Ata, not UHC. We adopted the Alternative Declaration of Astana and will take it forward as his legacy. Without knowing it, this was our farewell to Dave. With deep sadness, I would like to say to my comrade, colleague, professor, tutor and friend: A luta continua for health for all! Amandla ngawethu! Hamba kahle David! Carmen Baez

Carmen Baez
PHM Argentina
[email protected]
Buenos Aires, 18th September 2019 The People’s Health Movement organizations in Argentina regret the enormous loss represented by the physical disappearance of Prof. David Sanders, a steadfast fighter for HEALTH FOR ALL since Alma Ata up to the present. We were fortunate to host David in our country last May, some of us for the first time. We were enriched by his words that encouraged us to continue our work and our struggles and we were inspired by his example of coherence and perseverance. Hasta la Victoria siempre David! PHM Argentina: FAMG/AMGBA LAICRIMPO RED JARILLA ADESAM ALAMES SOBERANIA SANITARIA FORO RAMON CARRILLO La INTERNACIONAL DE LA ESPERANZA

Reginald Adjetey Annan
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
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I will remember David for his strength and passion for health promotion in Africa. I will remember him for his down to earth approach in dealing with people. I will remember him for his guidance and mentorship for young public health nutritionists. Thank you David for bringing us along through mentorship.

David McCoy
Peoples Health Movement
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I've written a longer tribute to David which is on the UWC School of Public Health website in which I tried to distill David's key characteristics and attributes and why they are important and relevant to the many challenges we face in global health, academia and society more generally. He certainly inspired me to think, act and be better - in many ways. And I for one will do what I can to continue his way of doing public health. It's great to see so many tributes to David and so much evidence of the impact he had on so many people - and it's a solace be part of the global PHM family, of which David was so fond. Go well. Hamba Kahle.

Kerry Cullinan
health journalist
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I have interviewed David many times, and he has always been patient and happy to explain his views in detail. When most health sector activists and researchers in South Africa were focused on infectious diseases, David was raising alarm bells about the rise in non-communicable diseases, particularly related to changes in diet. I remember bumping into him some years ago on Muizenberg beach and he called after me: "Not everyone is dying from HIV." I last interviewed with him a couple of months ago about SA's campaign to get a tax on sugary drinks and, as usual, he was busy thinking of ways in which he could help to push the agenda for a healthier country. He will be so badly missed for many things, including his generous mentoring of younger people, his passionate commitment to fairness and equality and his dry sense of humour. Hamba Kahle, David!

suwit wibulpolprasert
International Health Policy Program
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'Inspiration changes the world. David has inspired millions of new generation actors to change the world'.

Lola Dare
CHESTRAD Global
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Rest my dear friend. It was a deep privileged to know and work with you. A rare blend of knowledge, commitment and courage that I shall miss and we need now more than ever. Thank you for all you stood for. Sail David

Jane Booth
Nurse
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My condolence to the family and friends of Prof David Saunders. He was an absolute visionary and has worked tirelessly to promote equity in health care using his vast experience. He was an absolute beacon of hope in South Africa. I hope that his teachings will continue to inspire young poeple never to give up!

Howard Waitzkin
University of New Mexico, Allende Program in Social Medicine
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I am writing to thank not only David but also all of you who have described his wonderful impacts on your lives and those of so many others. His loss seems devastating, even for people like me who never had the opportunity of working closely or becoming friends with him. Beyond reiterating the admiration and gratitude that you already have expressed, I perceived that David was fundamentally a person of the non-dogmatic left. In fact, my final encounter with him happened last year at the Left Forum in New York City, where he participated in a session concerning our recent collective book on “moving beyond capitalism for our health.” David passionately wanted health for all, but also a new world order, based not on capital accumulation but rather on compassion, equality, mutual aid, and social justice. Gratitude to David flows partly from that legacy. David Sanders presente! Howard Waitzkin

Michael Krawinkel
University of Giessen, Germany
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Coming from a background of Primary Health Care for people in resource-poor areas of the world I always admired the clear views and perspectives of David. We met at many occasions and I enjoyed his wisdom, humour, and friendliness. His disappearance from the scene is a great loss and I feel grateful for having known David. His legacy will last far beyond his physical life. Thanks for all, David. Michael

Margaret Hilson
Retired Director of Global Health at the Canadian Public Health Association
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Dr David Sanders has been such a huge inspirational presence in the global struggle for health for all for the past 60 years. It is almost impossible to imagine his physical absence. However, I can think of almost no other individual who has imbued global health politics with such clear vision of social justice that could be brought about within and by the workers in the health sector. He did not suffer fools gladly; was not impressed by political privilege or power; shared his vision; promoted and encouraged young health professionals to choose the option of health for all and at the same time, was a consummate public health professional with equal respect for science, research and social activism. We are fortunate to have such a rich compilation of his writings to inform future generations. He will be greatly missed.

Melanie Alperstein
People's Health Movement -South Africa
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David you were a rock that kept us focussed, always critically analysing and re-analysing the causes of the causes of the causes and many other socio-economic and political aspects affecting our lives and particularly those in poverty. And your dry humour, to lighten the most serious times and discussions. words can't express how much you are and will be missed.

Fabien NKILI
MPS GABON
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tu resteras à jamais dans nos coeurs Prof. Repose en paix. tu as combattu le bon combat.

Hasheem Mannan
PHM India Ireland
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David's teaching, research and advocacy for right to health with access to primary health care will be a legacy that will be carried forward by us. My interactions with him over the years as a member of PHM Switzerland, India, USA and Ireland continue to guide my work and that of my own students.

Felistus Chipako
PHM Zambia
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David Saunders, I got to meet you in Bangladesh for the first and last time. I remain gratified that I learnt from the best. You are an icon for health rights not only in Africa but the world. Your spirit will continue the fight. Rest well in God's bossom.

Anthony Zwi
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
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A sad moment for global public health. David Sanders was an inspiration to me and many others. I got to know David well after doing my 5th year medical student elective with the Oxfam Health Team in newly liberated Zimbabwe. He worked to “rehabilitate” remote rural hospitals that were neglected or damaged during the liberation struggle, and to situate them in the broader health system context in support of primary health care. He helped health cadres trained in liberation armies, to gain a foothold in the post-colonial health system. It was a struggle then, and often still is, to give adequate recognition to those trained elsewhere, their diverse experiences, community and cultural roots, and bonds of trust and reciprocity. David generously engaged with shaping debates and practice in the health system under development: the “Struggle for Health” was ongoing. Securing the right to health was informed by deeply held political views, an emphasis on social justice, on equity in access to the resources and determinants that influence health. Hi commitment and dedicated contributions characterized his working life in Zimbabwe and South Africa and at a global intellectual and civil society level. His depth of purpose was balanced by his mischievous sense of humour, an infectious chuckle, a not-infrequent Yiddish story or witty observation. His joy was to engage, challenge, and stimulate. I last spent time with him at an event at the American University in Beirut, where we were generously hosted by the impressive local academics and students - dancing, laughing, eating, and of course, trying to make sense of a disturbed and deeply unfair world... I will miss him: he inspired a direction and focus that I try to keep alive in my own work. I wish family and friends long life.

Leslie London
PHM SA; University of Cape Town School of Public Health and Family Medicine
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Friend, activist, compatriot, combatant (intellectually), socialist, person of incredible principle, leader by example, inspiration, mentor to many mentors of others over generations, fearless fighter for justice, joker, supporter, facilitator, pioneer, warm, and beloved by family, friends, fellow activists - and respected for all this even by some of his biggest foes. David was all these things and more. We will miss him endlessly and have to find our way without him. But he believed another world is possible and so do we. That is David's legacy.

Norbert Hirschhorn
John Snow Inc. (JSI), retired
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I liked David enormously. We debated the comparative advantages of oral rehydration solution for diarrhea prepared either at home by the mother, or available in packets from a clinic or pharmacy. We disagreed but always in good faith and good nature. David always kept his principal focus on the family, not the medical system

Zaeem Haq
Save the Children
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We are much saddened to hear of this great loss. David was a true gentleman, an accomplished doctor, researcher and academic, and above all an ardent believer and champion for universal health rights. He worked for Save the Children twice; first as a consultant in early 2000’s as part of our Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre authoring a report on child health and poverty in 2004 which strengthened our cross-thematic focus and social determinants approach to health and nutrition. In 2011, he returned as our Regional Health & HIV Advisor for East & Southern Africa, following his ‘formal’ retirement from the School of PH he founded at the Univ of Western Cape. He wanted to be part-time and slow down a bit, although his passion kept him going strong till the last day. I can still remember being a bit embarrassed interviewing him for this role, but having him join us was quite exciting as he was a great resource for the team in London and country health advisors in the region. He visited a few of our country programmes, and made the most impact for our integrated health, nutrition and livelihoods programme in Tanzania. David may have worked briefly with us but he surely left his mark on Save the Children – by contributing to our policy positions on health & nutrition and our integrated approach to programming for vulnerable communities, by mentoring our global and country staff, and most of all by being a vocal champion for children’s rights in the global south. He spent a lifetime achieving great things. May he now rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are with David's family, friends and colleagues. Dr Zaeem Haq MBBS, MPH, FRSPH Medical Director Save the Children St Vincent House, 30 Orange Street, London, WC2H 7HH, UK www.savethechildren.net

Zaeem Haq
Save the Children
[email protected]
We are much saddened to hear of this great loss. David was a true gentleman, an accomplished doctor, researcher and academic, and above all an ardent believer and champion for universal health rights. He worked for Save the Children twice; first as a consultant in early 2000’s as part of our Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre authoring a report on child health and poverty in 2004 which strengthened our cross-thematic focus and social determinants approach to health and nutrition. In 2011, he returned as our Regional Health & HIV Advisor for East & Southern Africa, following his ‘formal’ retirement from the School of PH he founded at the Univ of Western Cape. He wanted to be part-time and slow down a bit, although his passion kept him going strong till the last day. I can still remember being a bit embarrassed interviewing him for this role, but having him join us was quite exciting as he was a great resource for the team in London and country health advisors in the region. He visited a few of our country programmes, and made the most impact for our integrated health, nutrition and livelihoods programme in Tanzania. David may have worked briefly with us but he surely left his mark on Save the Children – by contributing to our policy positions on health & nutrition and our integrated approach to programming for vulnerable communities, by mentoring our global and country staff, and most of all by being a vocal champion for children’s rights in the global south. He spent a lifetime achieving great things. May he now rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are with David's family, friends and colleagues. Dr Zaeem Haq MBBS, MPH, FRSPH Medical Director Save the Children St Vincent House, 30 Orange Street, London, WC2H 7HH, UK www.savethechildren.net

Zaeem Haq
Save the Children
[email protected]
We are much saddened to hear of this great loss. David was a true gentleman, an accomplished doctor, researcher and academic, and above all an ardent believer and champion for universal health rights. He worked for Save the Children twice; first as a consultant in early 2000’s as part of our Childhood Poverty Research and Policy Centre authoring a report on child health and poverty in 2004 which strengthened our cross-thematic focus and social determinants approach to health and nutrition. In 2011, he returned as our Regional Health & HIV Advisor for East & Southern Africa, following his ‘formal’ retirement from the School of PH he founded at the Univ of Western Cape. He wanted to be part-time and slow down a bit, although his passion kept him going strong till the last day. I can still remember being a bit embarrassed interviewing him for this role, but having him join us was quite exciting as he was a great resource for the team in London and country health advisors in the region. He visited a few of our country programmes, and made the most impact for our integrated health, nutrition and livelihoods programme in Tanzania. David may have worked briefly with us but he surely left his mark on Save the Children – by contributing to our policy positions on health & nutrition and our integrated approach to programming for vulnerable communities, by mentoring our global and country staff, and most of all by being a vocal champion for children’s rights in the global south. He spent a lifetime achieving great things. May he now rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are with David's family, friends and colleagues. Dr Zaeem Haq MBBS, MPH, FRSPH Medical Director Save the Children St Vincent House, 30 Orange Street, London, WC2H 7HH, UK www.savethechildren.net

RAVI RAM
PHM KENYA
[email protected]
Such an intellectual tower, a passionate social activist and a humble man - rarely do we see the best in humanity together in one person. Two of those three would be quite good in any person, but Prof. Sanders embodied them all. David did more than ask questions of society, disease, bureaucracies and institutions, comrades - though he was excellent at that. He tapped each of us in our souls, so that we also aspired for more justice, equity, in ourselves, our work and our societies. And, the way he did it was not as the formidable overlord he could have been, but as a companionable fellow traveler who we inevitably discovered to have a much better map than anyone else. David's passing is a shock to all of us. He has done so much for the world, and never tired of pushing for something new. I'll selfishly admit that I have thought of all the questions I hadn't yet asked him, and now will have to struggle without him. The one consolation is that after a full, eventful life, he passed peacefully, with his wife and in good health.  By random chance, David and I shared a dorm room after PHA4 (in Nov. 2018 at GK in Savar, Bangladesh - my good fortune, less so his). After a discussion one evening, and In a contemplative mood, David wondered what happened to us in civil society. He lived for the challenge of citizens demonstrating against those in power, marshaling moral integrity and intellectual firepower against vested interest that keep people poor and unhealthy. That was David, and as we commemorate his life with us, let us channel his passion and energy for the world he let us glimpse in the way he lived. A luta continua, vitória é certa!

Siyamthanda Dastile
Tulbagh Youth Forum, TAC Chris Hani Branch (Tulbagh), People's Health Movement SA
[email protected]
Hambakahle Prof. David Sanders... within 2 days at UCT medical campus during an NHI workshop (13-14 April 2019) he motivated me to go back to my small town (Tulbagh) to facilitate health awareness and issues faced by the Public Health. 14-15 September 2019 he was going to be here in Tulbagh (Rural Area) to Facilitate National Health Insurance Workshop, unfortunately he couldn't and it is very sad indeed and the workshop has been postponed for 28 September 2019 Long live the spirit... Tulbagh has Established active Health Structures namely Treatment Action Campaign and a number of people joined People's Health movement within our rural area. I will be attending the short course offered by International People's Health University in November because of him the Health movement continues... Hambakahle Comrade

Eduardo Espinoza
Asociación Latinoamericana de Medicina Social y Salud Colectiva. PHM-Latinoamerica
[email protected]
David Sanders in El Salvador DAVID Sanders, a fighter for the right to health of the peoples, of South African origin, died on August 30, 2019 at night. His physical disappearance shocked us deeply and filled us with sadness. Soon after, messages of condolence began to arrive from all over the world, which helped to alleviate our deep sense of nostalgia, regret and bewilderment. I met him in December 2000, in Bangladesh at the first People's Health Assembly (PHA-1), organized by the People's Health Movement (MSP / PHM) From then on, we were excellent friends and comrades who fully agreed on our ideological and political convictions. Thereafter we always meet again, with each new MSP People's Health Assembly, in the most remote places on the planet. Additionally, the coincidence in concerns and ideals evolved, as was natural, towards the shared development of multicenter research projects, together with researchers such as Ron Labonte, Roman Vega, Angelita Elias, Francoise Barten, Mario Róvere and other academics committed to the struggle for the right to health. This research generated important evidence to strengthen the struggle for the health of peoples and also gave us the pleasure of continuing to find and share experiences of struggle and hope. Especially valuable was to continue cultivating a strong friendship. One consequence being his presence in El Salvador in 2009. On that occasion we were fortunate that David visited us in the days before we joined the new FMLN government in El Salvador. With him we made a deep analysis of the health situation in the country, we validated and enriched the health proposal that we had already conceived, and identified the possibilities of support offered by the People's Health Movement to strengthen the process of Health Care Reform which was about to start in El Salvador. Thus was the seed of what would later become invaluable fruits in terms of training of community leadership and health personnel in the country, was sown in El Salvador through the UISP courses, which were held continuously for 8 generations with the most prestigious and committed academics of the MSP and ALAMES. El Salvador and the entire humanity acquired with this giant of Public Health is a debt that we have not yet been able to estimate. It is undoubtedly an irreparable loss for those of us who knew him, shared and worked with him. It is also for all the excluded, the poor and the marginalized to whom he dedicated his life and his work. May Mother Earth, whom he loved so much, be mild and generously welcome him in her bosom! Amandla Ngawethu!

Anne-Emanuelle Birn
University of Toronto
[email protected]
David Sanders was a beacon for the health left with an indomitable soul and spirit ~ ever acute in his political analysis, unflinching in speaking truth to and about power, and enormously generous and supportive in his mentoring of students, activists, and colleagues. What a privilege it has been to have witnessed his deep commitment to health justice, mostly from afar, and how awe-inspiring to see him, on a few occasions, in up close. Regretting that David left us when he still had so much to give, but appreciative of his legacy and tenacity, which will continue to resonate…

Alan Whiteside
Balsillie School and Professor Emeritus, University of KwaZulu-Natal
[email protected]
A giant of a man. His contribution to making the world more just was considerable and we have the task to continue it. So saddened by this news.

Sarah Khan
PHM UK
[email protected]
So sorry to hear such sad news about David. He was and always will be a huge inspiration for so many people. May he rest in peace always.

Julie Cliff
Faculty of Medicine, Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique
[email protected]
I read with shock and disbelief of David’s untimely death. Not so long ago, he had us laughing with relief as he told the story of his narrow escape from death after an attack by a swarm of wasps while fishing. No laughing now. I first met David in the early 1970s at a meeting in London of medical solidarity activists for the Mozambican, Angolan and Guinea Bissau (GAMMA) independence movements. Since those early days, David has never wavered in his commitment to political activism for health. He has combined brilliant analysis with a capacity to build – the nutrition programme in newly independent Zimbabwe, the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa, the People’s Health Movement internationally. The list goes on. In Mozambique, we remember the links he forged between the School of Public Health and the Community Health Department at Eduardo Mondlane University. Let his example as an internationalist live on.

Roger Ciza
HHNB& PHM Burundi
[email protected]
A devastating and sad news! May his soul Rest in Eternal Peace! Roger

Susan Michaels-Strasser
Columbia University
[email protected]
Rest in peace David. The world has lost a gem- a man who lived and breathed social justice and an option for the poor. His development of primary health care systems in Zimbabwe 30+ years ago were a model of excellence and the vision of Alma Ata. He was a steadfast leader in South Africa building public health training and public health programs routed in both the science and art of health and healing. We mourn a visionary, teacher and colleague. Let us continue to fight for health justice and primary health care. #thestruggleforhealth

Godfrey Philimon
People's Health Movement Tanzania
[email protected]
I don't see enough words to describe David Sanders for how he helped spark my career that I live on up to this day. In 2010 after completing my Bachelor Degree in Political Science and Public Administration at the University of Dodoma in Tanzania, I realised the health component has been of my interest especially when the communities do not understand their rights to health. While in the confusion as a new graduate, I met David on June 2012 when I had the opportunity to participate in the International People’s Health University (IPHU) training course (The Struggle For Health) which was followed by the Third People’s Health Assembly (PHA3). I feel very lucky and blessed to meet David in my life because he fulfilled my dream and opened my mind through that training session. I do remember the course was run by two weeks at the University of the Western Cape, led by the School of Public Health of which David is the Founder. From the training, when I returned home to Tanzania I kept in touch with him about how we could establish the People’s Health Movement Tanzania Circle. David is a very loving person because he loved to see his talents, knowledge, education, skills, professions, expertism and creation of what he believes continue to grow in other nations to save of this world. He supported me to establish the health movement country circle under the global health movement known as the People's Health Movement (PHM) and I am currently the health activist and advocate by professional, PHM Tanzania Country Coordinator and a human rights activist. I know David saw my passion that is why he has been very forward on guiding and advising me on many professional issues about my career as a health rights activist and PHM Country Coordinator in Tanzania. He has been one of the people on my list especially when I need to be recommended for my career or studies. I can't finish all that David did to help and support me rise up, I only continue to pray to God to forgive him of his human mistakes (if any) and to rest him in a good peace. Rest In Peace David Sanders, Long Live David Sanders.

Francisco Ferreira Songane
Retired UN official (WHO/UNICEF), former Minister of Health of Mozambique
[email protected]
Very sad news indeed. He was a GIANT. David was a symbol of continuous innovation and learning, extremely dedicated to public health with a drive to serve all without discrimination, and always preserving his verticality, even in circumstances when almost everyone seemed to be giving up under pressure from agendas aiming at circumverting the principles of public health. A strong advocate of the right to health, a leader in international health issues, consistent in his ideas, solid, someone to rely on. Nowadays, we are getting fewer and fewer people with this character at a time they are needed the most as we address UHC challenges in moving towards the 2030 Goals. May his thinking be always stuck on the back of our minds as an inspirational source to hopefully achieve Health for All. Condolences to his Family, all our Brothers in South Africa, and the whole Public Health Familiy worldwide.

STEVE MACK
new york
[email protected]
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Zizipho Norubela
UJ DFC SASCO AND DENOSA SM
[email protected]
May his soul rest in eternal peace. We're very humbled to have benefited from his knowledge. He has played a huge role in unpacking the NHI with PSI YW and we'll forever miss his humble soul for his contribution to our struggle as we continue to fight for justice in the health sector. A true soldier has fallen✊ Rest in Power Leader.

Lovey Mbonani
SAMWU (PSI YOUNG WORKERS)
[email protected]
May his revolutionary soul rest in perfect peaceMay his Revolutionary Soul RIP . .. We shall continue fighting championing for a Universal Health Coverage for the people of SA the poor in particular..

Godfrey Philimon
People's Health Movement Tanzania
[email protected]
Tributes for David Sanders: The death of former President Mugabe when we are still mourning the death of our beloved Prof. Sanders reminds me of one story Prof. David told me when having a dinner in Geneva during the 7Oth World Health Assembly (WHA70) 2017. Years ago, David went to Zimbabwe from South Africa where he lived with his family. He came in with his friend (I don't remember the name he told me) for a seminar and workshop. In the middle of the operation he came to be told by his close friends that there were clues by the Zimbabwean government to arrest him. There he gave up everything he had been doing and started traveling through the rats-way back to South Africa. Having arrived in South Africa but never arrived yet home. News Reports started circulating in the media in Zimbabwe and South Africa that David and his team are being hunted by the Zimbabwean government and all borders are closed so they cannot cross. He says he won't forgot the shock he experienced at home especially his wife and family members. He ended the story but told me, as an activist I should be very careful with friends because friends are your eyes and sometimes your enemies. However, don't be afraid of what I end up defending and especially if it contains facts and evidence. It really captured my imagination this David's story. Long Live David Sanders.

Peter Delobelle
University of the Western Cape / Unviversity of Cape Town
[email protected]
Strange how I always thought that David would never come to pass. A man of his stature simply seemed to be invincible. Always on the lookout for his critical comments and words of advice, it never occurred to me that one day we would have to face the fact that this was not a given, and that we should be grateful for every minute he spent with us, somewhere quietly observing in a corner waiting for the right time to raise his hand and display his wisdom in ways that would inevitably impress but also leave us with a smile. David was not a man of many words - but when he spoke you could hear a pin drop. Straight to the core but also straight from the heart, a man of great intellect but also wit, fun to be with and confronting at the same time. His concern about the wellbeing of his fellow men and his activism, but also modesty inspired me tremendously and played a huge role in my decision to move to this country that he loved so much, in order to join the struggle for a better life and Health for All. He will be sorely missed and I feel privileged to have known him as a colleague and friend. RIP David and thank you for all you have done for us.

Peter Delobelle
University of the Western Cape / Unviversity of Cape Town
[email protected]
Strange how I always thought that David would never come to pass. A man of his stature simply seemed to be invincible. Always on the lookout for his critical comments and words of advice, it never occurred to me that one day we would have to face the fact that this was not a given, and that we should be grateful for every minute he spent with us, somewhere quietly observing in a corner waiting for the right time to raise his hand and display his wisdom in ways that would inevitably impress but also leave us with a smile. David was not a man of many words - but when he spoke you could hear a pin drop. Straight to the core but also straight from the heart, a man of great intellect but also wit, fun to be with and confronting at the same time. His concern about the wellbeing of his fellow men and his activism, but also modesty inspired me tremendously and played a huge role in my decision to move to this country that he loved so much, in order to join the struggle for a better life and Health for All. He will be sorely missed and I feel privileged to have known him as a colleague and friend. RIP David and thank you for all you have done for us.

Godfrey Philimon
People's Health Movement Tanzania
[email protected]
I don't see enough words to describe David Sanders for how he helped spark my career that I live on up to this day. In 2010 after completing my Bachelor Degree in Political Science and Public Administration at the University of Dodoma in Tanzania, I realised the health component has been of my interest especially when the communities do not understand their rights to health. While in the confusion as a new graduate, I met David on June 2012 when I had the opportunity to participate in the International People’s Health University (IPHU) training course (The Struggle For Health) which was followed by the Third People’s Health Assembly (PHA3). I feel very lucky and blessed to meet David in my life because he fulfilled my dream and opened my mind through that training session. I do remember the course was run by two weeks at the University of the Western Cape, led by the School of Public Health of which David is the Founder. From the training, when I returned home to Tanzania I kept in touch with him about how we could establish the People’s Health Movement Tanzania Circle. David is a very loving person because he loved to see his talents, knowledge, education, skills, professions, expertism and creation of what he believes continue to grow in other nations to save of this world. He supported me to establish the health movement country circle under the global health movement known as the People's Health Movement (PHM) and I am currently the health activist and advocate by professional, PHM Tanzania Country Coordinator and a human rights activist. I know David saw my passion that is why he has been very forward on guiding and advising me on many professional issues about my career as a health rights activist and PHM Country Coordinator in Tanzania. He has been one of the people on my list especially when I need to be recommended for my career or studies. I can't finish all that David did to help and support me rise up, I only continue to pray to God to forgive him of his human mistakes (if any) and to rest him in a good peace. Rest In Peace David Sanders, Long Live David Sanders.

Walter Loening
University of Cape Town
[email protected]
It is good to have this opportunity to pay tribute to David, a man of considerable renown and held in high esteem, not only by academic colleagues but also by those working towards uplifting the disadvantaged. David and my friendship goes back to the mid-1980s when he invited several of us from South Africa to a community health conference in Harare. It was an extraordinary event where David had brought in the many of those with whom he had worked in the very young Zimbabwe. Accommodation was scarce but he manged to cater for everyone at this very productive event. Already then we admired him for what he had already achieved regarding health care for and with the community. David had seen the desperate need and rose to the challenge. In due course I realized that he thrived on this type of challenge and invariably seemed to find ways and means to meet obstacles. We worked side by side for a year at the University of KZN where he was appointed to the Deputy Deanship for Medical Education Development and student counseling. However, he needed a wider field and successfully established the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape. What a challenge veritably met yet again! His many publications and articles are well known; The Struggle for Health has probably become the foundation-stone for all students in the field of community health. I also offer my sincere condolences to Sue and her three children. Sue was the one who stood at David's side throughout tough and glorious times. Walter Loening Cape Town

Irwin Friedman
Sustainable Enterprise for Enabling Development
[email protected]
I am so deeply saddened. David, you were my friend, colleague and mentor. You enriched me and our country with profound and wise advice over many decades. Your were our lodestone in the march towards equitable, universal and quality Health for All based on the principles of Alma Ata. In these troubled times, we will miss your guidance. My heart goes out to your family, friends and comrades left behind. The struggle continues ...✨💥⚡️

Humphreys Nsona
Ministry of Health - Malawi
[email protected]
David was a humble, great and excellent human in building, supporting and creating opportunities for health. I first met David when he came on a mission to Malawi to lead a team on the evaluation of community case management, an intervention the country has just introduced as was at infancy. His insights and feedback then helped country team pull together approaches that would see community case management work as a comprehensive package. He was unique and offered guidance in several forums we met globally...We will miss him and his contributions. May his soul rest in peace

Mushtaque Chowdhury
BRAC University
[email protected]
The passing of David is an irreparable loss to the movement for people's health. David and I have been good friends since the 1980s. I first met him in London when I was studying for my PhD at LSHTM. I was struck by his knowledge and concerns on the issues of health faced by the poor and other disadvantaged groups, and his forceful plea to include them in the mainstream health policy discussions. He worked closely with Dr Zafrullah Chowdhury to organize the first PHA in Savar in 2000 and the PHM was born. In 2004, we invited David to a consultative meeting prior to the launching of the BRAC School of Public Health. His presence and contributions helped us to understand the ideas around community-based experiential learning which is now fully practiced at the School. He was a great exponent of learning from the people. In November 2018, the 4th PHA was organized in Savar again. A large number of foreign delegates were stranded at Dhaka airport and not being allowed entry for some miscommunications. David was terribly upset and contacted Sir Abed for help. BRAC's interventions solved the problem and all the delegates were granted entry and attended the meeting. I was pleasantly surprised to see in him the concerns. I met him again at the Prince Mahidol Conference in Bangkok in January last and he was so grateful for what BRAC did to make the PHA happen. He was a great soul. We will miss you Dear!

Emmanuel Tangumonkem
ACADI Cameroon/ PHM Cameroon
[email protected]
You lived with focus and you fought the battle tenaciously and unwavering. You greatly inspired me to choose the course I am presently on. I know that victory is sure. We won't hear the voice again when we shout out "AMANZA" but the memories will remain in our hearts. I will tell future generations about David the great, who laboured for the poorest of the poor to get access to basic health care. Adieu professor.

Matt Fisher
Southgate Institute, Flinders University
[email protected]
Thanks you David for your dedication to the causes of social justice and human wellbeing. I can hear your voice now, which always had such wise words to say, coming from a depth of commitment and experience over a lifetime.

David Bishai
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
[email protected]
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation called David to Seattle in 2015 to meet with the co-Chairs during a learn from the experts session devoted to primary health care. David delivered the most cogent explanation ever of the rationale for why comprehensive bottom up primary health care would help the foundation accomplish so many of the goals it had around the rubric of tech development and delivery. We lost him far too early, there is so much more work to do. We get to keep the inspiration he gave us and our realization of the truths he shared.

Wilson Asibu
Country Minders for Peoples Development
[email protected]
I knew David Saunders sometime back and lastly met him during the International Peoples Health University (IPHU2018) in GK and PHA-4. I admired him for his deep understanding of health issues and their determinants and his fearlessness and bluntness. He will be greatly missed

Jan De Maeseneer
Ghent University
[email protected]
I met David for the first time in 1995 in Cape Town. He was an inspiring person,and later he took the floor in many meetings to defend equity, social justice, to fight povety, ..and to stress the impirtance of social determinants of health. David was not only a global thinker, but also a Global Activist in PHM. Last year, he gave a wonderful key-note at the Ntwork Towards Unity for Health Conference in Limerick: committed, passionate, ... My condolences to David's family. Prof Jan De Maeseneer, Former Secretary-General, The Network: TUFH (2007-2015)

Jadranka Mustajbegovic
Academy of Medical Sciences in Croatia
[email protected]
“Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal.” — Anonymous

Jerry Coovadia
Match
[email protected]
A comrade and esteemed friend in the world of public health and democracy. I considered him as one of the mentors I had in that perilous subject of health within the freedom struggle in South Africa.Kind ,offbeat and gentle, razor sharp in the analyses of policy and practice, irreplacebale!

Naadira Munshi
Public Services International
[email protected]
PSI pays tribute to the life of Comrade David Sanders PSI is shocked and saddened to hear of the passing of Comrade David Sanders on Saturday, 31 August 2019. A dedicated activist, academic and practitioner, Sanders was a globally renowned academic and health activist, and founding member of the People Health Movement. An emeritus professor at the University of the Western Cape’s School of Public Health, Sanders committed his life to the struggle for justice, and the struggle for health for all. Comrade Sanders was well known to PSI. We had worked closely with him in South Africa to fight for a People’s National Health Insurance scheme. And globally, we had initiated discussions with him for a detailed research work to critique the global “Universal Health Coverage” discourse and for strengthening policy advocacy and campaign for universal public health care. He will miss be sorely missed, particularly by the young workers in our affiliates who worked closely with him in South Africa for the People’s NHI campaign. Comrade Sanders had worked tirelessly to fight for a People’s NHI, and one which takes seriously the contribution of Community Health Workers in our health system. His contribution to PSI's National Health Insurance Task Team in which he brought a wealth of knowledge and experience cannot be overemphasized. We will continue to cherish this and are challenged to build on it. We send our sincere condolence to Sanders family, friends and comrades. We honour and celebrate his life that he committed to struggle and justice. Hamba Kahle Comrade David Sanders

Simrin Kafle
PHM Nepal
[email protected]
My heartfelt tribute to Prof. Dr. David Sanders, the legend of Public Health and People's Health Movement....Your guidance and contribution have always aspired all the activists from around the world to continue the struggle for health....We are indebted and will surely express our gratitude through our actions and spirit for equity and justice in health.... You are in my heart David... In solidarity, Simrin

Sharon Friel
Australian National University
[email protected]
David, thank you. You showed us how to bring together a deep concern for humanity and fairness through research, activisim and your every day practices. I will always cherish your constant support and encouragement. Rest in peace

Milin Sakornsin
Thai Health Promotion Foundation
[email protected]
Dear David, Thank you for all your lessons. I still recalled when you lectured me on how important primary health care to health promotion is. It is truly sad that I will never have any chance to listen to your intense debate anymore. Respectfully yours, Milin

Oscar Feo
ALAMES Venezuela
[email protected]
Conocimos a David como un luchador por el derecho a la salud y como un profesional íntegro. Lamentamos su partida, seguiremos su lucha.

Margarita Posada
Foro Nacional de Salud
[email protected]
Maestro y compañero perseverante, seguirás vivo en nuestras luchas, en cada una de ellas reivindicaremos tu memoria y a tu amor a la vida. HASTA LA VICTORIA SIEMPRE COMPAÑERO

Mary T Bassett
Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health
[email protected]
It was my daughter, now in her 30s, who sent an alarmed note to me with the news that David was gone. This source would probably have pleased David, as he worked to cross generational and so many other kinds of divides. I am from the US and grew up in New York City, but for many years Zimbabwe was home. I met David in 1985 when I had just finished my medical training, which is endless, and had decided that I should work in Africa. I was invited for an interview in Harare. That weekend David showed up at the gate. Ben was in the backseat and David said, “I thought you might like to see some places that you aren’t likely to be shown.” He took me to Mbare, the single men’s hostels, the market and so on. And so began the 17 years I would spend in Zimbabwe As for so many others who have written remembrances, David was a mentor and a friend. When I told him recently that he was the best boss I ever had, I think he thought I was joking- he didn’t carry himself as a “boss”- but it was true. As chair of Community Medicine at the University of Zimbabwe, he gave guidance and opened doors. He invited Leon Bijlmakers and me to join him in studying the impact of structural adjustment on health under the auspices of Peter Gibbon at the Nordic African Institute. His activism should not obscure from his commitment to research. David was determined that we make a statement- using our research skills- on this extremely damaging policy. He encouraged me to apply for academic promotion. I would probably have remained a junior lecturer. This selfless generosity was not special to me- it was replicated over and over again among the many he knew. I was honored to give the David Sanders lecture at the UWC SOPH, the institution he worked so hard to build. And, I should add, he was very funny. “Retirement” seemed not to have slowed David down. I often felt that we took him too often from his family. For Sue and his children Ben, Lisa and Oscar his death must be truly devastating. I am so sorry. We don’t get people like David Sanders very often: A fearless public intellectual and a good friend. The best way to honor him is to carry on his commitment to the struggle for health.

may haddad
phm
[email protected]
Lucky are the ones of us who have met you, our beloved David <3 Amandla Ngawethu! https://mayhaddad.wordpress.com/2019/09/01/amandla-ngawethu/

Rhali Aziz
Association marocaine des droits humains
[email protected]
Dear ALL C est une grande perte pour l activité des droits humains en général et le droit à la santé en particulier , pour commémoré David Sanders il faut continue sur les choix de David c est à dire le choix des droits .

David Oginga Makori
PHM-Kenya
[email protected]
The hand of cruel death has robed us, David Sanders. David was a mentor, father to the PHM family and loved by all. In public forums and lectures halls, He taught about inequities in the health system, and why community health workers mattered in every healthcare facility in every village. David courageously stood firm to promote primary healthcare, health equity, and health as a human right, and constantly engaged in social activism for communities whose health is compromised by injustice and inequality. ‘David you’ve fought the good fight, you’ve finished the race. May your soul rest in peace’.

Qamar Mahmood
International Development Research Centre (IDRC) da
[email protected]
This is indeed very sad news and a huge loss for global public health! I have known and worked with David since 2003 and have admired his work, passion and compassion. He had been a dear friend and a mentor. My condolences for his family and loved ones. I will miss him.

Camila Giugliani
PHM Brazil
[email protected]
In the name of PHM Brazil, I deeply thank David Sanders, for being our inspiration and example of an activist who has had the courage to fight injustices, always, and of a professor who has made the best use of his knowledge and academic achievements to bring light to the struggle for health for all. We will carry his teachings with us and will always miss him. He put on our hands the seed to plant PHM Brazil.

Denis Joseph Bukenya
Human Rights Research Documentation Center (HURIC)/PHMUGA
[email protected]
Fare well thee Prof. Sanders. A fallen combatant to be missed by all, a mentor to many and a comrade to all who has made it to the next world. Your selflessness for humanity has written your name in the history books of the greats and the works of your hand will be remembered for eternity. Professor Sanders’ words of poetic justice in health will now go down in history as wisdom that will challenge the living to carry on the fight of health for all to its logical conclusion if ever. These words still echo in our ears, linger in our hearts and envision in our efforts. You structured your every word of activism with such creativity and amazed me with such rich lessons on the right to health. I cannot count how many times I have visited your Library for wisdom as I commenced my activism business and the countless times I have borrowed leaf from your works. In your memory, I pledge to try to impose on the People’s Health Movement Uganda chapter the institution of a memorial lecture in Uganda that will emulate and re-echo your works and ideas to the PHM UGA activists. I will miss looking out for you every time I had a score to settle with the PHM global secretariat, your mentor-ship and guidance. The world has lost a reputable man and it is my prayer that we who subscribe to your activism ideology do not quay sail. Thank you Lord for the time accorded to us with Prof. Sanders and may his soul find rest and eternal peace, comfort to the family as we mourn your departure. Thanks Prof. Sanders.

Toby Freeman
Southgate Institute for Health, Society, and Equity, Flinders University
[email protected]
I had the extreme pleasure of working with David for a decade on comprehensive primary health care projects. He came to Adelaide often, and I always enjoyed wrangling his - I can see in the tributes - infamous slides, and helping him with his temporary Australian SIM card, or other technological issues. One of the last things we worked on together was his impact statement for a grant application, which described to me unfathomable achievements over the course of his life. Squeezing it into the character count requirement of the grant was a struggle. He will be sorely missed, personally, and politically.

Louis Reynolds
PHM South Africa
[email protected]
In my chaotic study, next to my office chair, is an empty dining room chair. I used to carry it in here whenever David rushed round to co-write an article or prepare a presentation. We would sit at my computer and argue about what the main message should be, quibble about fonts and text sizes and layout; add, reorder, and delete slides. It seemed to me that there were always too many slides, and David always disagreed. On the Thursday 8 days before he died we sat here working on a piece for the Daily Maverick. He was his usual self; finding the time time to get some gardening advice from Mary Jane and to joke with Nellie and check on her sugar intake. There was no sign that anything would happen to him; no indication that he would not always be around. And now he’s gone. He will never sit on that chair again. It will now always bear a kind of emptiness, as will I, and countless others who knew him. To me the most wonderful theme running through the many accolades to David that come flooding in is the way he influenced so many people’s lives. Even small children loved him instantly. He recognised immediately what made each one of them tick, and nurtured it in their games and the tricks they played and their conversations with him. Our grandchildren felt important when he was around. They will miss him deeply. Few people who had meaningful encounters with David came out unchanged. They saw themselves and the world, and their place in it, in a new light. They understood that they have power, and that they could use that power to change things, especially if they encouraged and mobilised others to join them. Many of them went on to do great things and to change the lives of others. And this ongoing cascade of bringing people to new insight and influencing others will be part of his enduring legacy and true to his utter and uncompromising dedication to make the world a better place for us and future generations to live in.

Bill Genat
PHM Australia
[email protected]
Homage to a global hero carrying the torch for comprehensive primary health care, a sword to cut through delusion and holding the flower of compassion, now cast into the beyond eternally emanating radiance and whole-sum-ness into the wider life of this planet - vale David, with deep gratitude.

Christa Cepuch
MSF (ex HAI Africa)
[email protected]
Prof Sanders was a hero to me and so many others. I did my MPH at the SOPH because of him. We have lost a giant in the world of public health and social justice. Rest in Peace and Power, Prof. With endless respect for your strength and commitment, Christa

Shuaib Manjra
UCT
[email protected]
A towering presence, an agile mind, expansive experiences, always principled, activist, academic, mentor to many. RIP David. We will miss you deeply.

Alexis Benos
PHM & IAHPE
[email protected]
dear David I understand that this is your ultimate joke... Nevertheless for the rest of us it is not even a bad joke. It is the unbearable reality, it is a shock for all of us knowing you as a beloved and close friend with affective feelings and sarcastic humour, as an inspiring leader of PHM and all the global movement struggling for health, or as the ideal combination of a respected academic with a grass roots movement militant comrade. All the above characteristics of your personality are making impossible filling the vacuum you are leaving with your absence in all respects. The international movement "struggling for health" will be, unfortunately, crucially affected. Your unquestionable leadership skills and mainly flair and inspiration will be greatly missed. The role model of an academic investing all his skills and stamina to the international movement is becoming gradually a precious quality very seldom present in all movements driven nowadays mainly by professional interests. Our longstanding friendship, which started from the 80's in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with both you and Sue, is violently disrupted with your undue departure. We promise you to keep our bounds with Sue and the kids. We promise you that, all of us - the militants struggling for health all over the world - will multiply our efforts in order to empower the movement that you dreamt of and determined its foundation and its up to now successful history, the People's Health Movement. Farewell my dear friend,

Ghassan Issa
Arab Resource Collective (ARC)
[email protected]
what an immense loss of an exceptional fighter for the right of all people every where to have health for all now. i met David in the year 2000 during the first PHA in Savar-Bangladesh, the establishing event of PHM. since then i never recall him resting for one second from the battle of the right for all now. watching him from a distance was always inspirational. Rest in peace comrade as the PHM continue the strive.

Mike Mbizvo
Population Council, privously WHO Director for Reproductive Health and Research
[email protected]
I worked with David at Harare Hospital in the 70s, and later the University of Zimbabwe Medical School at Parirenyatwa hospital. He later moved on to head the School of Public Health at the University of the Western Cape. Throughout, he displayed an extraordinary passion for alleviation of ill-health arising from social injustice and poverty. David, while a professional in public health, his life was that of a global icon and public health activist.

Shanti Raman
PHM Oz, PHAA
[email protected]
David Sanders was instrumental in getting me active and angry about global injustice in health. A giant of the People's Health Movement

Ronald Labonte
University of Ottawa
[email protected]
I began working with David around 2000 when we got involved in a critical assessment of the G8 countries health commitments. The upcoming Canadian-hosted 2002 G8 summit included a focus on Africa and the result of our study came out two years later as the aptly titled book Fatal indifference. Our collaborations continued over the years, perhaps most crazily with the PHM-initiated and IDRC funded study we co-led on Revitalizing Health for All, which culminated in another eponymously titled book based on the findings of over 20 research projects in almost as many countries. David would often smile in his patented way, shake his head, and wonder how we ever got involved in something quite so ambitiously mad. But we did, because the ‘struggle for health’, as those who knew David know, was his political and moral passion, one that he was so adept at sharing with others that it was impossible ever to say no to something David would ask you to do with him. He suffered poorly the business-as-usual rhetoric too often colonizing global health policy debates, and had a talent for humorously (or not, but always politely) knocking the stuffing out of a lame argument with a short phrase or two and a inviting shrug. He was also able to tell an amusing story at just the right time in tense PHM meeting. I was always taken with David’s ease in teaching (though I know he worked hard to create that ease), and with his ability to run through 150 slides in a 40-minute talk. A mentor, a friend, a colleague, a global leader, a tireless fighter for justice in health and against health injustices. He leaves big hole in our collective efforts to improve global health equity, a bigger personal hole in that place reserved for loving fondness, and I feel for Sue, his family, and all the other friends, colleagues, and global health activists whose lives he touched in almost magical ways. One small comfort I might take from his untimely death: That he spent some of his last hours engaging in something he often described as just slightly more important than the struggle for health – the struggle to hook (and then release) a fish, preferably a brook trout.

Nancy Krieger
Chair, Spirit of 1848 Caucus (American Public Health Association) and Professor of Social Epidemiology (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA)
[email protected]
When I was newly entering the field of public health in the mid-1980s, I was greatly influenced by David’s book “The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment” (London: MacMillian, 1985) – and the dedication (which I am reminding myself of now, as I hold his book in my hands) says much about his lifelong commitment to health justice: “This book is dedicated to the children of the poor in Zimbabwe and their mothers who made me learn something about the struggle for health.” Ever since, I looked to and learned from his ceaseless work & his critical contributions at meetings (including at WHO meetings regarding the work & follow-up for the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health), and likewise followed his many contributions to helping build the People’s Health Movement. May we all carry forward his memory, spirit, and commitments.

Desire Habonimana
People's Health Movement Burundi (PHM Burundi)
[email protected]
Dear Prof. David Sanders, Your love of humanity and your commitment to improving people’s health especially health of the poor are immortal. We will remain connected by heartstrings into infinity. Your bravery left an indelible imprint in our memories. May your soul Requiescat in pace!

Romeo Irankunda
PHM Burundi
[email protected]
I had the chance to meet David Sanders at PHA4 in Savar, Bangladesh. I still remember his inspiring presentation during PHA4. In his recent article published in the Lancet in August 2019, he warned of a further deterioration in the health of people on behalf of CSU. Great loss for the PHM and the world ... Sincere condolences . The fight for health will continue RIP Great Dav.

Alexis Benos
PHM & IAHPE
[email protected]
dear David I understand that this is your ultimate joke... Nevertheless for the rest of us it is not even a bad joke. It is the unbearable reality, it is a shock for all of us knowing you as a beloved and close friend with affective feelings and sarcastic humour, as an inspiring leader of PHM and all the global movement struggling for health, or as the ideal combination of a respected academic with a grass roots movement militant comrade. All the above characteristics of your personality are making impossible filling the vacuum you are leaving with your absence in all respects. The international movement "struggling for health" will be, unfortunately, crucially affected. Your unquestionable leadership skills and mainly flair and inspiration will be greatly missed. The role model of an academic investing all his skills and stamina to the international movement is becoming gradually a precious quality very seldom present in all movements driven nowadays mainly by professional interests. Our longstanding friendship, which started from the 80's in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with both you and Sue, is violently disrupted with your undue departure. We promise you to keep our bounds with Sue and the kids. We promise you that, all of us - the militants struggling for health all over the world - will multiply our efforts in order to empower the movement that you dreamt of and determined its foundation and its up to now successful history, the People's Health Movement. Farewell my dear friend,

Araya Medhanyie
Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
[email protected]
I had the opportunity to work with Prof. David on a research project for three years back in 2008/11. We published a paper and book chapter together. He was in Mekelle, Ethiopia (my home town) few months ago and we had a great time. So sad to hear this bad news. He was an amazing mentor. I have never seen a mentor as humblest as he is. His humanity and simplicity is beyond my words. He has influenced me in many ways. Oh..My dear Prof David, rest in peace, and my sincere condolences to his beloved family, colleagues and friends.

Araya Medhanyie
Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
[email protected]
I had the opportunity to work with him on a research project for three years back in 2008/11. We published a paper and book chapter together. He was in Mekelle, Ethiopia (my home town) few months ago and we had a great time. So sad to hear this bad news. He was an amazing mentor. I have never seen a mentor as humblest as he is. His humanity and simplicity is beyond my words. He has influenced me in many ways. Oh..My dear Prof David, rest in peace, and my sincere condolences to his beloved family, colleagues and friends.

Rhoderick Machekano
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation
[email protected]
Farewell David. You were a great human being. It was in 1991 when you first gave me chance to work in public health at the University of Zimbabwe Medical School. I will be forever grateful because that chance changed the course of my life. Meeting you last year in Cape Town after more than 25 years was an honor a farewell to note. RIP David - you fought a good fight for the well being of the human race.

Biram Ndiaye
UNICEF
[email protected]
I will always remember, Prof David Sanders contribution to create a critical mass of public health and nutrition specialists in Africa. My sincere condolences to David's family and friends. Biram

Alexis Benos
PHM & IAHPE
[email protected]
dear David I understand that this is your ultimate joke... Nevertheless for the rest of us it is not even a bad joke. It is the unbearable reality, it is a shock for all of us knowing you as a beloved and close friend with affective feelings and sarcastic humour, as an inspiring leader of PHM and all the global movement struggling for health, or as the ideal combination of a respected academic with a grass roots movement militant comrade. All the above characteristics of your personality are making impossible filling the vacuum you are leaving with your absence in all respects. The international movement "struggling for health" will be, unfortunately, crucially affected. Your unquestionable leadership skills and mainly flair and inspiration will be greatly missed. The role model of an academic investing all his skills and stamina to the international movement is becoming gradually a precious quality very seldom present in all movements driven nowadays mainly by professional interests. Our longstanding friendship, which started from the 80's in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with both you and Sue, is violently disrupted with your undue departure. We promise you to keep our bounds with Sue and the kids. We promise you that, all of us - the militants struggling for health all over the world - will multiply our efforts in order to empower the movement that you dreamt of and determined its foundation and its up to now successful history, the People's Health Movement. Farewell my dear friend,

Linda Mans
Manskracht
[email protected]
Thank you so much for your inspiration, David. My condolences for your family, friends, and the People's Health Movement.

Debbie Bradshaw
South African Medical Research Council
[email protected]
It is with great sadness that we heard of David's death over the week-end. Condolences to Sue and the children. David has made a major contribution through his critical thinking and passion for social justice in health - a legend in his own time. Hamba Kakuhle.

Andre-Jacques Neusy
Training for Health Equity Network: THEnet
[email protected]
We mourn the passing of David Saunders a colleague, an irreverent friend fierce in his fight for social justice, with little patience for pontificating experts in global health. He was a true cosmopolitan son of Africa totally dedicated to make health a universal right. Thank you David for all the great accomplishments you have made during your passage on earth. We miss you.

Andre-Jacques Neusy
Training for Health Equity Network: THEnet
[email protected]
We mourn the passing of David Saunders a colleague, an irreverent friend fierce in his fight for social justice, with little patience for pontificating experts in global health. He was a true cosmopolitan son of Africa totally dedicated to make health a universal right. Thank you David for all the great accomplishments you have made during your passage on earth. We miss you.

Nana Ama Frimpomaa Agyapong
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
[email protected]
It is extremely sad to learn that you are no more. We thank God for your life and the opportunity to know you and the great opportunity we have through your vision and hard work. Our deep condolences to your family. May your soul rest in peace

Barbara Hutton
SOPH
[email protected]
Condolences to David's family. What an honour it was to work with him, to be guided by him. He will be deeply missed.

Collins Abere Liko
Economic and Social Rights Centre-Hakijamii
[email protected]
It is indeed sad to have lost such a great mind and inspiration. Your legacy and passion for a healthy world informed by peoples struggles will live on. Rest in Peace comrade.

Denis Kibira
Coalition for Health Promotion and Social Development (HEPS-Uganda)
[email protected]
What a great loss it is to the entire fraternity of the People’s Health Movement. We shall miss your zeal for human rights. Your efforts have not been in vain. RIP David Sanders.

Nafis Faizi
Aligarh Muslim University
[email protected]
One of the biggest regrets of my life would be not knowing you earlier. Nevertheless, I will never forget your immense clarity and expertise in understanding public health and the advice that you gave in Kathmandu, and later at Savar. I am sure many of us would agree that your strong fundamentals and clear ideology was backed by incisive comments that have been immensely useful for the young (& not so young prefessionals). Few people would have the courage to work and deliver in areas of humanitarian crisis and speak truth to power. As I and my IPHU colleagues remember your Zimbabwe-South African excursions during difficult times, it still gives us goosebumps and reminds us of the immense strength, courage and determination that you had. I still believe that, 'The Struggle for Health' and 'Questioning the solution' are a must read books for any student of public health. I believe that the revised edition of the former still comes out. Thank you for your immense contribution and changing our lives and our approaches in Public Health. You will always be remembered and your inspiration will always enlighten us in the sontinuing struggle for health. Thank you David.

Salim Abdool Karim
CAPRISA
[email protected]
It is with deep sadness that we learnt of David's untimely passing. He was a stalwart in the struggle for health. Slim first met David when he was invited to speak at the Medical Students Clinical Conference at University of Natal Medical School in 1980. So many of the students were moved by his ideas and he left a lasting impression. We respected him both as an academic and an activist. An icon of the primary health care and health care worker movements, he has left an indelible mark on the world, with many of us committed to his ideals. He will be sorely missed. May his soul rest in peace. Slim & Quarraisha Abdool Karim

Peninah Khisa
PHM East and Southern
[email protected]
I was quite sudden with the demise of Professor Sanders, really death is cruel. I have known Sanders for few years, he was a great leader, a mentor and inspiration to many. I remember him saying “the struggle will never end until you die”. He was in the forefront in making sure comprehensive primary health care is achieved for all. As a region we have lost a father and a mentor whose legacy and knowledge he imparted on us will forever remain in our hearts. Shine on your way.

Ellen Shaffer
Center for Policy Analysis on Trade & Health (CPATH)
[email protected]
So very sorry to hear this news. David was always brimming with ideas and analysis about the economic, social & political forces that undermine equality in health & resources, & how to mobilize for progress. He was enormously gracious, generous & hospitable to Joe Brenner & me during our work in South Africa in 2006. We grieve to hear this untimely news, & send solidarity to his family, students & colleagues.

Nicholas Freudenberg
City University of New York School of Public Health
[email protected]
David was a friend, colleague and role model. His passionate commitments to social justice, public health scholarship, and making a difference in the world inspired me , my colleagues and my students. He always insisted both on having the best evidence possible for improving health equity--and making sure that evidence was used in the political arena to make changes. I will miss him and honor his life by continuing as best I can the work he championed.

Erick Otieno Owuor
Kamukunji Paralegal Trust (KAPLET)
[email protected]
Professor David Sanders is gone, but his spirit and vision will never be forgotten. He was a great mentor and a friend to many in the struggle for health. May his dream for health for all become a reality. Rest in eternal peace great hero!

Dr Abdoulaye KONE
Association Malienne pour la Défense du Droit à la santé
[email protected]
Nous avons rencontré la première fois à l'IPHU de Dakar de 2011. De cette date à son décès il n'a cessé à chaque rencontre de nous émerveiller, de nous capacités avec ses brillantes exposés dont le dernier était celui de Bangladesh. Une très grande perde pour la.santé mondiale

Linda Shuro
People's Health Movement Global
[email protected]
I am so glad to have known David. He was really committed to the struggle for health and making a difference at all levels. I really enjoyed his supervision when I studied for my masters and also working together within PHM to strengthen the movement in Africa. I am shocked by the news but I hope I can make a difference in the struggle for health having gained a lot from interacting with David. Zorora murugare David (Rest in Peace David).

Fran Baum
People's Health Movement (PHMOZ) & Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity, Flinders University
[email protected]
Farewell dear David. More than anyone I know you have been a warrior for global health justice. Always deeply insightful in your analysis of the global political economy and fearless in speaking truth to power. How many times have you stood up in an international forum and swum against the stream to point out the obvious injustices in the world? How many times have you challenged us on the PHM Steering Council and caused us all to stop, think and reconsider? How many times have you convinced young doctors and other health professional to consider more than just medical treatment? You’ve been my most important mentor and shown me how you can combine a successful academic career while also being a progressive health activist. I’m going to miss doing research and writing articles with you, thinking through problems and solving some of them, laughing together and being your PHM comrade. It is so hard to believe that you won’t be joining us as planned to speak at our symposium on the 16th September and to be the keynote speaker at two People’s Health Movement events in Adelaide and Sydney. Now sadly instead we will be paying tribute to your life’s work and the amazing impact you’ve made worldwide. You’d be amazed at the global outpouring of grief and sorrow on social media showing the deep affection in which you are held across the global by so many people. Thank you for 28 years of comradeship and wonderful friendship and for all I’ve learnt from you and the support I’ve received from you. Vale David and rest in peace knowing that you have inspired so many others who will pick up the struggle for health that you carried on throughout your life.

Krishna Shrestha
WHO
[email protected]
Saddened to hear the demise of the great public health leader, Your absence is a great loss for Public Health. May your soul rest in eternal peace

Kingsley Kwadwo Asare Pereko
Peoples Health Movement Ghana
[email protected]
Fare thee well Prof. Sanders. Not just another but a very great personality, selfless for humanity, a mentor and a comrade has made it to the next world. It is another moment in history where the living is challenged to carry the fight for health for all to the end. His voice for "health for all" still echo in our ears, minds and heart. He had a very nice way of putting across very sound and great ideas. He always amazed me with the great lessons on primary health care and health governance and was more of an open library anytime I encountered him. PHM Ghana will forever be grateful for his affection towards us. We will greatly miss his unofficial visits and meetings anytime he had a programme in Ghana. We look forward to instituting a memorial lectures in your name to carry your voice out and loud. The world country, family, PHM fraternity and PHM Ghana has lost a gem very hard to replace. Its our prayer the Lord find rest for your soul and comfort to the family as we mourn your departure. Thanks Prof. Sanders for a life so impactful.

Jennie Popay
University of Lancaster UK
[email protected]
What a tireless activist for social justice he was. What a terrible loss to us all in the international movement for equity in health. Thankfully he leaves behind a powerful legacy - the multitude of people around the world that he has inspired in so many ways. Thank you David. X

Kenneth Mwehonge
Coalition for Health Promotion and Social Development (HEPS Uganda)
[email protected]
As HEPS Uganda and PHM Uganda, we are still struggling to accept the sad news of the passing on of Prof. David Sanders. I met David in 2011 in Uganda and I was mesmerized by his humility, he was such a down to earth man. His been such an exemplary leader and mentor for many of us, we will dearly miss you David. Your legacy will forever live on. RIP

Dr. Dorothy Chinwendu Chanda
University of Zambia, School of Nursing Sciences.
[email protected]
It was really devastating to hear about the sudden death of this great intellectual who has given all of himself to ensure that every one acesses good health without exception. This he prooved through his passionate and active participaation in Universal Health Coverage , and PHC strategic activites. I still hold very dear your lectures on Determinants of health when we attended the PHM Assembly in Cape Town. We pray that the angels guide you safely to the bosom of our Lord Jesus Christ whom you saw in all things that you did as you transited this world. We pray for God's strength for your wife and family as they mourn your demise. MHSRIEP.

Dr. Dorothy Chinwendu Chanda
University of Zambia
[email protected]
It was really devastating to hear about the sudden death of this great intellectual who has given all of himself to ensure that every one acesses good health without exception. This he prooved through his passionate and active participaation in Universal Health Coverage , and PHC strategic activites. I still hold very dear your lectures on Determinants of health when we attended the PHM Assembly in CCape town. we pray that the angels guide you safely to the bosom of our Lord Jesus Christ whom you saw in all things that you as you transited this world. We pray for god's strength for your wife and family as they mourn your demise. MHSRIEP.

PHM-UGANDA
PHM-UGANDA
[email protected]
Prof David Sanders was such an Influential global academic and health activist known to many of us across the health advocacy spaces. Globally he was known as a passionate, critical thinker and a champion of health rights in the struggle for health. We are delighted that his life phenomenally impacted many lives especially in the PHM fraternity and the broader civil society. His contributions to many independence struggles in Africa, pronouncements against inequalities in health accessibility, exploitation and welfare distribution in societies are inerasable and will continue to be the cornerstone of our movement across the continents. It is a great loss to both us and the global arena. His wisdom and knowledge will always be passed on and he will live with us forever.

Pacôme Tomètissi
PHM West & Central Africa
[email protected]
Tribute to David Sanders: An African giant has gone Death has torn from the loves of his family, the people’s health and anti-globalization movement, a baobab creating as results a big emptiness. Tribute to a unique and irreplaceable African who dedicated his life to helping others. We are speechless to express our gratitude to this faithful friend, this guide that made us hope and believe in people’s health, and who has always been present and committed by our side until his last breath. We can individually and collectively be proud of one of our intrepid companions. His struggles, David led them with a characteristic firm conviction and openness. He was one of the pioneers of the struggle for health and human dignity in Africa, an activist like all of us are dying to be one day. A real giant of Africa! If David Sanders did not receive a Nobel Peace Prize, it may be that the world is not yet grateful enough to one of its ‘’artisans’’. But the health movement will still remember that in South Africa, there was not only Mandela or Desmond Tutu, there also was... David Sanders! The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the politics of underdevelopment, a book of influence David Sanders is an influential actor of the public health movement. His book The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment co-authored with Richard Carver in 1985 (Macmillan: UK) has influenced academics and civil society in the past three decades, including resistance to neoliberalism in health. In this book, the founder and former director of the School of Public Health at the University of Western Cape first demonstrated that the reduction in illness and premature mortality in UK has resulted from improved living standards and hygiene and only to a very limited extent from specific preventive measures and curative services. He went on to say that transplantation into low and middle income countries of the western health system is part of the broader process of expanding the capitalist system, adding that Western health systems are more concerned with the medical profession and the commercial interests rather than peoples well-being. According to him, far from improving health, these transplantations maintain the system that perpetuates poor development and health problems. Finally, he appealed to expatriate health workers to make available to their home country what they have learned so that primary health care will become the basis of health care systems and there will be more democracy and transparency in the management of health. One of the most beautiful tributes to the famous disappeared would be to read (or reread), understand and adopt this book of influence that fueled the anti-neoliberal protest in Africa and around the world. Sênoudé Pacôme Tomètissi, PHM West & Central Africa

Pacôme Tomètissi
PHM West & Central Africa
[email protected]
Tribute to David Sanders: An African giant has gone Death has torn from the loves of his family, the people’s health and anti-globalization movement, a baobab creating as results a big emptiness. Tribute to a unique and irreplaceable African who dedicated his life to helping others. We are speechless to express our gratitude to this faithful friend, this guide that made us hope and believe in people’s health, and who has always been present and committed by our side until his last breath. We can individually and collectively be proud of one of our intrepid companions. His struggles, David led them with a characteristic firm conviction and openness. He was one of the pioneers of the struggle for health and human dignity in Africa, an activist like all of us are dying to be one day. A real giant of Africa! If David Sanders did not receive a Nobel Peace Prize, it may be that the world is not yet grateful enough to one of its ‘’artisans’’. But the health movement will still remember that in South Africa, there was not only Mandela or Desmond Tutu, there also was... David Sanders! The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the politics of underdevelopment, a book of influence David Sanders is an influential actor of the public health movement. His book The Struggle for Health: Medicine and the Politics of Underdevelopment co-authored with Richard Carver in 1985 (Macmillan: UK) has influenced academics and civil society in the past three decades, including resistance to neoliberalism in health. In this book, the founder and former director of the School of Public Health at the University of Western Cape first demonstrated that the reduction in illness and premature mortality in UK has resulted from improved living standards and hygiene and only to a very limited extent from specific preventive measures and curative services. He went on to say that transplantation into low and middle income countries of the western health system is part of the broader process of expanding the capitalist system, adding that Western health systems are more concerned with the medical profession and the commercial interests rather than peoples well-being. According to him, far from improving health, these transplantations maintain the system that perpetuates poor development and health problems. Finally, he appealed to expatriate health workers to make available to their home country what they have learned so that primary health care will become the basis of health care systems and there will be more democracy and transparency in the management of health. One of the most beautiful tributes to the famous disappeared would be to read (or reread), understand and adopt this book of influence that fueled the anti-neoliberal protest in Africa and around the world. Sênoudé Pacôme Tomètissi, PHM West & Central Africa

Michael Ssemakula
PHM-UGANDA
[email protected]
David was a man of character. I remember his last engagement with us in Uganda in July 2019, Inspired me to stand boldly and firm for what is right even in the face of compromise. He told me "even if the integrity of the African leaders has been bought through huge monies of multinational corporations, the few of us can remain in the right standing." The role David has played in advancing social justice in health globally is unforgettable. We shall forever miss him

Billy Mwangaza
PHM D.R Congo
[email protected]
David, c'est avec un cœur en larme que je suis entrain d’écrire ce message. Pourquoi tu doit partir? Tu es pour le @Phm DR Congo un mentor, un accompagnateur, un motivateur, un vrai acteur du changement, un exemple. Et pour moi tu reste mon Idole dans la lutte pour la Santé pour tous. La lutte que t'a commencé produit des fruits partout dans le monde et aujourd'hui nous te promettons que nous allons continuer sur la même ligne afin que les peuples du monde découvrent leur Droit à la Santé. Tu restera à jamais dans nos cœurs. Repose en Paix.

Felistus
PHM Zambia
[email protected]
This is such a terrible moment in my lifetime. Rest well Mr Saunders. I was so honoured and humbled to have met you and learnt a lot. You have left an unmatched legacy. Rest in peace in God's bosom. You ran your race amicably. Will never forget you. Condolences to the PHM Global, Africa and South Africa. It hurts.

Nicole Valentine
World Health Organization
[email protected]
Dear David, your presence, together with that of Amit Sengupta's, will be sorely missed on the global public health stage as we move into the new decade. I remember with fondness your participation in and contributions to the World Health Organization Commission on Social Determinants of Health. The struggle for health justice, for which you stood for so long, must go on. But your voice will be very much missed.

Andreas Wulf
medico international
[email protected]
Dear all, such a big loss! My condolences to his family and friends in South Africa and the comrades in the wide People's Health Movement. And i will miss most the wit and humour of our comrade David, who loved to celebrate after intense conference days while he was cracking jewish jokes , one more hilarious than the other. Now we will never hear him laugh again! RIP, David! Andreas

Dieter Mueller
medico international
[email protected]
Dear friends and comrades Please accept and share with David’s family, friends and colleagues our deepest sympathy for this sensible loss. As Andreas already stated “such a big loss! And I will miss most the wit and humour of our comrade David, who loved to celebrate after intense conference days while he was cracking jewish jokes, one more hilarious than the other. Now we will never hear him laugh again! RIP, David!“ I had the privilege to meet David in the early 90tis, in Palestine, at the IPHC conference. My salute “David presente”, as our Latin American comrades use to say to commemorate somebody who we will never forget and who will always be with us and our common struggle. Dieter and all colleagues at medico international Germany

David Legge
People's Health Movement
[email protected]
Farewell dear friend. I will miss you in so many different times and places. I will miss being with you: chatting around the Amarula; tussling over text; chewing over strategy. I will miss watching you charm the high fliers while warmly supporting the rest of us. I will miss you in meetings: multi tasking - always multitasking - and then offering a breakthrough around the issue which was holding us up. I will miss your presentations: fiddling with your slides until the last moment; showing yet again the slide about the Japanese cow or the one about comprehensive PHC; and then speaking slowly and clearly and conveying complex ideas in the simplest of ways. I will miss the stories of research initiatives which you have led: the documentation of structural adjustment in Zimbabwe; tracking the turds; and the empty pantries. I will miss our conversations about the continuing relevance of earlier struggles, including Trotsky versus Stalin. I will miss the ethical compass which you were for all of us, epitomised perhaps by the Palestinian scarf that you seemed to wear at all our rallies. I will miss your humour: always engaging and inclusive. But most of all I will miss the assurance of knowing that you were there, somewhere: guiding, supporting, listening, inspiring. Thank you dear friend, for everything, including but so much more than, The Struggle for Health.

Renée de Jong
Wemos
[email protected]
It was a real honor to learn from David during the WHO watch in Geneva! Truly inspiring. My condoleances to all his loved ones and friends from the People's Health Movement.

Barbara Fienieg
Wemos
[email protected]
Such sad news, a kind person and a fierce defender of the right to health, such a loss to the world. Heartfelt condolences! Barbara Fienieg

Komakech Job
Center for Health, Human Rights and Development
[email protected]
You looked beyond yourself and fought for those who can not fight for themselves. Rest in peace

Itai Rusike
Community Working Group on Health (CWGH) and PHM Zimbabwe
[email protected]
I salute David for the man that he was and mentor to many. This was the greatest guy in public health! He fought the good fight, the struggle for health! May we take up his mantle and reach the finishing line for PHC. We are richer for having known one as great as David and may God rest his soul

Garance Upham
WAAAR
[email protected]
Very sad indeed. My first talk with him in a café in Geneva had convinced me then to join and work with PHM, right after a public talk with Claudio Shuftan.. Through David i became convinced that PHM had brought together brilliant minds. Over 15 years I always found David to be a free thinker with such a deep committment to equality that he never fell into the trap of fads. And again this May he was outstanding on Climate Change with his comment from the floor that it is corporations and not individuals who can make the difference! (G2H2, pre-WHA event. Geneva). We are sad indeed! Let all those committed to EQUALITY keep up the fight for social and economic justice!

Thomas Schwarz
G2H2 / MMI
[email protected]
David was an authority, in many ways. When he called for a “New International Economic Order” (Astana 2018), when he challenged the way the WHO Code of Practice on the international recruitment of health personnel avoided to address the issue of compensation, when he challenged the shortcomings of universal health “coverage” , this was not just fancy advocacy, but rooted in his biography, knowledge, personality. At the Geneva Global Health Hub and in our meetings and Assemblies, we could never expect from him an easy “yes”, but rather a challenging question – which pushed us to work harder to get him on board. The teacher is gone. He will be missed by many. My condolence for his family, friends, and the People's Health Movement.

Maziko Matemba
Health and Rights Education Programme (HREP)
[email protected]
Am at loss of words to lose the regend in the struggle for health will forever remember Prof David Sanders for believing in us as CSOs as game changers in public health Rest Well Prof we will continue the struggle for health as you taught us....Maziko Matemba In Malawi

G Srinivasa Rao
JSA - India
[email protected]
Met him 1st time in Dhaka during PHA and seen his presentation on global health issues and movement. Committed and worked for primary healthcare. Lost a great personality who is instrumental in advancement of health movements and global coordination with another stalwart com Amit Sen Gupta whom we lost very recently. Let us committee ourselves to carry forward their legacy and sustain struggles for equitable health.

Akif Akalin
Sinifin Sagligi
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A tribute for David Sanders in Turkish (published yesterday). http://haber.sol.org.tr/blog/sinifin-sagligi/akif-akalin/david-sandersi-yitirdik-269519 http://toplumcutip.blogspot.com/2019/09/david-sanders-yitirdik.html

Akif Akalin
Sinifin Sagligi
[email protected]
A tribute for David Sanders in Turkish (published yesterday). http://haber.sol.org.tr/blog/sinifin-sagligi/akif-akalin/david-sandersi-yitirdik-269519 http://toplumcutip.blogspot.com/2019/09/david-sanders-yitirdik.html

Devaki Nambiar
George Institute for Global Health
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A towering figure was Prof Sanders, keenly aware of politics, fearless, clear-headed, firm, and deeply compassionate. There was so much left to learn for so many of us and like Amit, we look to our memories and his legacy for courage and direction.

Wim De Ceukelaire
Viva Salud
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The global movement of people’s health activists has lost a giant, a warrior, a hero. Today’s news of David Sanders’ death is devastating for comrades and friends in the struggle all over the world. He was a mentor to all of us and combined a scientist’s boundless passion for facts with an activist’s absolute intolerance to injustice. Because of this rare combination of talents he could be merciless for the powerful, to whom he stood up whenever he had the occasion, but he could also be extremely patient and compassionate for the poor, the young, the powerless. Whenever he took the floor and grabbed a microphone, you knew people in high places became uncomfortable. When he bowed over to someone in the street, in a restaurant or in someone’s home, you knew he was really interested in the smallest details of people’s lives. He was one of a kind. David Sanders was also a true friend with whom I enjoyed working and building the global People’s Health Movement. I spent hours with him in serious and sometimes heated discussions but I also shared countless lighter moments. I’ll cherish the memories: The 2010 soccer World Cup final, the bottles of Amarula in various hotel rooms, the dinners at our place in Brussels, his consoling words after the untimely death of our comrade Amit Sengupta, his jokes about our adventures in Dakar in 2011 as well as his rousing speeches and insightful presentations in so many places. His life was devoted to the struggle for health for all. The struggle for health was his life. The best way to honour him, is to make it ours as well. Amandla Ngawethu!